Elektroda.com
Elektroda.com
X
Elektroda.com

network accessories for a single family house

414 22
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • Level 3  
    Hello,
    the question concerns the components of the Internet network in a single family house,
    I laid the cable 6 screened category.
    On the one hand, to properly ground cables, I want to use a panel patch in front of the router.
    I have to make a purchase today, unfortunately I do not know it.
    Internet provided by optical fiber and adapter on rj45, 500/50 link speed
    Please, advise whether the following network components are worth attention:

    1. Wardrobe
    CABINET RACK GETFORT 19 INCH 15U 600X450 HANGING

    2. Patch panel
    FTP CAT.6 PATCH PANEL 24 PGF-6FTP24-B6 GETFORT PORTS

    3. Router
    Cisco RV345 Dual WAN Gigabit VPN Router


    4. Wifi AP:
    UAP-AC-LR Ubiquiti UniFi AP, AC Long Range


    I am asking for advice
    Adam
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    Do not buy a patchpanel with LSA connectors, because then there are some modifications on the panel. In addition, more importantly, they usually have a separation (Cat 6 and higher) for DC voltage, so that PoE power to AP and other devices will not work.
    You can buy good keystones under the QLANtec brand. They are identical keystones as under the ALANtec brand, only without the possibility of network certification (you probably will not be doing her :-) at home?).
    The keystone panel itself is now free to search in the middle price range.

    I do not know the cabinet's production, but these cheap models have no reinforcement along the side walls (there is only a full frame on the back and around the door). Looking at the location of the screws in the pictures, this wardrobe also has it. Never buy such cabinets because they sag. Then there are those that tie a :-) rope on the ceiling and it was not a joke.
    Good closets are sold to Dipol in Krakow under the brand Signal. If you have a place, I would take a slightly deeper model. You never know what you will be in the wardrobe in a few years.
    Grounding the cabinet is preferably, of course, a 4mm2 cable directly to the main grounding bar of the building.
  • Level 12  
    IC_Current wrote:
    In addition, more importantly, they usually have a separation (Cat 6 and higher) for DC voltage, so that PoE power to AP and other devices will not work.



    Hmmmm ... I have already sewn in dozens of patchpanels and it never happened that PoE would not work ...
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    The first time it happened to me ... I was stupid because I thought I had sewn the wrong wires and corrected them several times. Then I improved the existing installations several times when I had to run PoE (after myself also :-) )
    In a better quality panels there is a double track layout on the board. LSA bars are not directly connected to RJ45 sockets. Paths from the slat and slots are approaching each other on a certain distance (in the shape of two "hooked" S letters), thus creating a capacitor. This capacitor is in fact serially connected to the transmission line. It filters low-frequency waveforms, but transmits fast-changing signals.
  • Level 3  
    Thanks for the information. I have a question about earthing using keystones. With the LSA rail, we fix the shields of wires to the rail and the rail has a wire that connects to the ground. I understand that in the case of keystones, the metal keystone housing connected to the cable screen is connected by fixing it with a patchpanel, which in turn has an earthing conductor ??
    Does it look like that?
  • Level 43  
    adam_997 wrote:
    Cisco RV345 Dual WAN Gigabit VPN Router

    What is the reason that colleague chose such a router?

    Cisco from the RV family is as if it is a bit boring - I used to have a Cisco RV320, setup problems, it worked as wanted, most often it was impossible to match the VPN tunnel, not because the data was correct, after restarting what worked stopped working.
    General range of torments and disasters.
  • Level 3  
    KOCUREK1970 wrote:
    adam_997 wrote:
    Cisco RV345 Dual WAN Gigabit VPN Router

    What is the reason that colleague chose such a router?

    Cisco from the RV family is as if it is a bit boring - I used to have a Cisco RV320, setup problems, it worked as wanted, most often it was impossible to match the VPN tunnel, not because the data was correct, after restarting what worked stopped working.
    General range of torments and disasters.


    Somewhere I have heard that this is a remarkable company and I have found a router of this gigabit company with 16 ports (I need so much) and a VPN function.
    Could you, then, offer me something else in a similar price range and above parameters?
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    Cisco has products for several target groups. The lowest series are products of other companies that Cisco has bought or is their shareholder and is branding its logo.
    I'm mounting Cisco but higher models and I can not say anything bad. I did not use RV. I also have doubts that such a device will actually cope with the 500 Mbps connection, even in such a simple implementation as the home network.
    I would rather buy a Ubiquity ER Pro home, especially since you have AP from this company.
    Like something more consumer-oriented, but with VoIP gateway features, DECT base, I would consider Fritzbox.
    Switch if managed, then Unifi (you have a common console with AP). If unmanaged, then any gigabyte.
  • Level 43  
    adam_997 wrote:
    found a router for this gigabit company with 16 ports (I need so much)

    Any router and switch with 16 1Gb ports will also take care of it, and it should still be free of charge.
    IC_Current wrote:
    I did not use RV. I also have doubts that such a device will actually cope with the 500 Mbps connection, even in such a simple implementation as the home network.

    I checked this on the 1Gb net and it works quite well - but it's in the heart you need to consider whether you want the equipment "calm" or you are interested in "impressions" :D
    IC_Current wrote:
    I would rather buy a home Ubiquity ER Pro

    I would like to suggest Ubiguiti EdgeRouter Lite and buy the switch even Netgear GS116E-200PES (if nothing in the switch we change it is unmanaged and if we want to change something like VLAN, LACP, port cloning etc is manageable).
    Why would I prefer such a set and not all in one - in the event of a restart, reset of the router, the LAN network functions independently of the router and the data can be forwarded in the LAN.
  • Level 3  
    KOCUREK1970 wrote:
    and here I would like to propose Ubiguiti EdgeRouter Lite and buy the switch even Netgear GS116E-200PES (if nothing in the switch we change it is unmanaged and if we want to change something like VLAN, LACP, port cloning etc is manageable).


    So I chose this router: Ubiguiti EdgeRouter Lite.
    Is the switch: Ubiquiti EdgeSwitch ES-24-Lite a good choice?
    Maybe the one proposed above is better: Netgear GS116E-200PES
    I do not know if there are any arguments for using the equipment of one company. AP will also be with Ubiguiti.
  • VIP. A meritorious for the electrode
    Management will be possible from one console.
    If the price does not deter you, take everything from Ubiquiti.
  • Level 36  
    adam_997 wrote:

    So I chose this router: Ubiguiti EdgeRouter Lite.
    Is the switch: Ubiquiti EdgeSwitch ES-24-Lite a good choice?
    Maybe the one proposed above is better: Netgear GS116E-200PES
    I do not know if there are any arguments for using the equipment of one company. AP will also be with Ubiguiti.
    My opinion is that the managed switch to the house is unnecessary. I would prefer an unmanaged switch but with PoE. You'll power up both pointy access and some cameras if you ever need or other devices.
    I also use netgear GS116LP at home. 16 ports with PoE and for this passively cooled, without a fan.
  • Level 3  
    m.jastrzebski wrote:
    My opinion is that the managed switch to the house is unnecessary. I would prefer an unmanaged switch but with PoE. You'll power up both pointy access and some cameras if you ever need or other devices.
    I also use netgear GS116LP at home. 16 ports with PoE and for this passively cooled, without a fan.


    What is the switch management? Blocking access to pages / content, speed limit for a given device, for that matter?
    Until now, I used only routers and from their level such functions were available.

    If, however, I would like everything from Ubiguiti to get POE, can I apply an additional patch panel from POE? Do you have any tried models?
  • Level 36  
    adam_997 wrote:
    m.jastrzebski wrote:
    My opinion is that the managed switch to the house is unnecessary. I would prefer an unmanaged switch but with PoE. You'll power up both pointy access and some cameras if you ever need or other devices.
    I also use netgear GS116LP at home. 16 ports with PoE and for this passively cooled, without a fan.


    What is the switch management? Blocking access to pages / content, speed limit for a given device, for that matter?
    Until now, I used only routers and from their level such functions were available.

    If, however, I would like everything from Ubiguiti to get POE, can I apply an additional patch panel from POE? Do you have any tried models?

    If you do not know what a managed switch gives you, you probably do not need it.
    By default, you have a power outlet. Cable from the switch with a grommet, small power supply on the other side, on the other hand an AP cable, eg 3 devices, 3 grommets, 3 power supply units, power strip. You are drowning in cables.
    I have 5 devices at home for now. With the router, the APs were powered from one of the mentioned switches. Dramatically reduced number of cables. As if you had even a few cameras, I can not imagine having a power supply and a PoE card for each.

    There are different types of PoE. Statically always sent voltage data on the given data. At every producer, I can differ a little and have to be careful.
    They can operate on 100mbit / s or 1000mbit / s

    Standard, i.e. PoE af / at, where power is sent dynably only when the end device needs it. This will power good cameras or good AP (ubiquity too). You have a router, switch and just network cables.
    Ubiquity definitely has switches from PoE. But the Gigabit switch from PoE without a wind (essential home) did not find a bigger one than the 16 port above. Each 24 gb / s port had a fan for cooling.
    4-8 port certainly you will find without a fan.
  • Level 3  
    m.jastrzebski wrote:
    If you do not know what a managed switch gives you, you probably do not need it.


    that is, if I use a router with a switch, then settings such as blocking access to pages / content, speed limit for a given device, VPN etc. I set on the router? An unmanaged switch only allows you to connect more devices to the router? I understand it well?
  • Level 36  
    adam_997 wrote:
    m.jastrzebski wrote:
    If you do not know what a managed switch gives you, you probably do not need it.


    that is, if I use a router with a switch, then settings such as blocking access to pages / content, speed limit for a given device, VPN etc. I set on the router? An unmanaged switch only allows you to connect more devices to the router? I understand it well?

    Exactly.
    With Switch you can manage traffic within a local network - for example, to separate virtual subnets, eg in a company, that department A does not see computers in department B as part of one local network. It matters like masses of more of these switches. At home - in my opinion, unnecessary expense.
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    adam_997 wrote:
    If, however, I would like everything from Ubiguiti to get POE, can I apply an additional patch panel from POE? Do you have any tried models?
    If Ubiquiti switches, then you have these models:
    https://www.senetic.pl/ubiquiti/ubiquiti_unifi/unifi_switches/
    Where power is given in watts, there is power to the PoE devices. Something for everyone, depending on the number of ports. If Ubiquiti, you can actually manage and update the software of all components from the console. The console may be in the form of a program on a computer - free or in the form of a small box included in the network - CloudKey. This version is rather for commercial installations, although the road is not.
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    I see a few inaccuracies in the statements of colleagues. The console can be centrally managed only by Unifi series devices.
    Switches and routers that have the Edge / Pro designation are not managed from the central console, only individually through the configuration panel www or via ssh.
    Well, unless something has changed lately, which I do not know.
  • Level 3  
    thank you all for the hints.
    I choose the Ubiquiti set: router, switch and AP.
    I have the last dilemma with AP. There are two models that I take into account:
    UAP-AC-LR and UAP-AC-PRO.
    The first has a range of 183 meters and a speed of up to 867 Mbps
    The second has a range of 122 meters and a speed of 1300 Mbps.
    Ap will be installed in a storey house (117 m2) between the ground floor and the floor, on the ceiling line. Is the second model that has theoretically inferior coverage but is faster to cover the whole house with coverage? Suggesting coverage or speed?
    Please help
  • Level 36  
    adam_997 wrote:
    thank you all for the hints.
    I choose the Ubiquiti set: router, switch and AP.
    I have the last dilemma with AP. There are two models that I take into account:
    UAP-AC-LR and UAP-AC-PRO.
    The first has a range of 183 meters and a speed of up to 867 Mbps
    The second has a range of 122 meters and a speed of 1300 Mbps.
    Ap will be installed in a storey house (117 m2) between the ground floor and the floor, on the ceiling line. Is the second model that has theoretically inferior coverage but is faster to cover the whole house with coverage? Suggesting coverage or speed?
    Please help

    These speeds and ranges are pure marketing. Do not ask for it.
    It's best to take two AC lights, one per floor.
    The difference in the speed given results, among others, from the number of antennas (MIMO 2x2 or 3x3). Only that the number of computers or phones that support this mode of operation is negligible. What's more, Wifi AC, which is theoretically the largest, works at 5Ghz. For one wall of bearing from these hundreds of mbit / s, in practice, a fraction of the speed remains. If you do 1 AP for the whole house, then you can also take the corners of the house, that AC will basically be useless.
  • Network and Internet Specialist
    I would also be inclined to UAP AC Lite. Two devices will provide a much better coverage than the LR version (the more so because in the phone or laptop you do not replace the card and the communication must be two-way).
    At the beginning you can buy one device, and as the range will be insufficient (or speed achieved) in some corner of the house, you will buy the second device on the second floor.
  • Level 3  
    IC_Current wrote:
    I would also be inclined to UAP AC Lite. Two devices will provide a much better coverage than the LR version (the more so because in the phone or laptop you do not replace the card and the communication must be two-way).
    At the beginning you can buy one device, and as the range will be insufficient (or speed achieved) in some corner of the house, you will buy the second device on the second floor.


    And does the other device have to be plugged into LAN, does it work as a signal amplifier?
  • Level 36  
    I see a long way in front of you.

    We recommend you two APs, because one signal will be weak. If it is weak what is to receive the second one in repeater mode?

    Do you want to buy expensive equipment well and then you want to ruin it with a repeater? Only cable.