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DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V

zzeus 25302 14
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  • #1
    zzeus
    Level 9  
    Hello, I have a DeWALT DCD985M2 20V max drill with an original 120V charger. I would like to convert it to 230V, I sent a question to the manufacturer, what is the limitation. In response, I found out that the capacitor and the mosfet are the main limitation. I wonder if something else should be replaced and if I don't have to do anything with the transformer (rewind).

    I found a similar topic topic2645725 except that this charger is not a toy that needs 30W, but about 200W, besides, I would rather connect the power supply directly to the socket than carry an additional transformer with me.



    To the point, the capacitor marked in the photo is 220 uF 200V and the mosfet is 6R299P.

    DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V
    DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V

    Unfortunately, all the integrated circuits have been polished by the manufacturer, so it will be difficult for me to read more markings.
  • #2
    ciasteczkowypotwor
    Level 41  
    There is a topic on the electrode with a description of what to change to make it work. Look for.
    From what I remember, it was about the 18V model
  • #3
    zzeus
    Level 9  
    Thanks for the info, I suspect it's about the topic topic7751539 unfortunately this is a completely different NiCd charger made by Delta, mine is for Li-ion made by Phihong.
  • #4
    ciasteczkowypotwor
    Level 41  
    An inverter, like an inverter, you are basically interested in the primary side. Look what changed there, then compare it to yours.
  • #5
    zzeus
    Level 9  
    Unfortunately, the original side does not even differ, but it is completely. However, I am wondering about the place on R4 and R5 which is compact on this PCB. There is a similar looking DCB105 charger model that works under 230V, maybe the difference is only in the presence of these two resistors?

    So I quickly drew a piece of the original page and a diagram from that thread for comparison.


    DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V



    Edit

    DeWALT DCB101 - Charger conversion from 120V to 230V
  • #6
    Jingiel
    Level 21  
    At the moment I have a DCB105 charger on the table and the construction is similar to yours. The primary resistors are 0.36? 5W. If you need anything, speak up. The transistor in mine was damaged, but the charger still does not work properly. After connecting the battery, the LED blinks to show the charger failure. The capacitor for me has a value of 150 uF / 400V. However, this kind of mosfet is actually a STPS 20150CT diode, a schottky diode 150V 2x10A TO220. You probably need to replace it with a diode with a higher voltage.
  • #7
    airbob
    Level 20  
    Hello
    As my friend brought me such a DCB101 charger and I am tired of converting it to 220V, I have a question, has anyone already done it?
    At the moment, I do not have a hole with a hole at hand to unscrew it and look at it. I wonder if the whole thing will not be a hit, or should it not have a different transmission?
    You have a diagram of one of the DCB101 or DCB105 chargers.
  • #8
    profesorek_96
    Level 16  
    I am struggling with a similar problem as the conversion of this charger.
    What the correct conversion should look like. What needs to be replaced to work on 230v?
  • #9
    airbob
    Level 20  
    I gave up.
    I am not a specialist in converters, but I have some idea and, for my common sense, a transformer that has the primary winding adapted to voltage keying (160V after straightening) will not withstand 320V (after straightening).
    Somehow, no one boasted a working remake. Maybe they didn't last very long.
  • #10
    profesorek_96
    Level 16  
    So what is the replacement for the DCB101 to be able to charge the 20v batteries? Will DCB105 work?
  • #11
    erykeryk
    Level 2  
    Hello
    Knowing that I have a converted 120 / 230V charger, I unscrewed it and the only differences I notice are:

    1. R4 and R5 5W 0.33ohm resistors
    2. Q1 is 11N80C3 ... about 8 zlotys
    3. C3? (large electrolyte) 120u / 400V
    4. Network cable as standard ...

    GOOD LUCK
  • #12
    ronwald
    Level 27  
    It is easier to buy a 230/120 transformer for a few pennies :)
  • #13
    erykeryk
    Level 2  
    even easier to go to the states - nothing needs to be changed ... :)
    However, the Trafo 200W is an additional device, it will not enter the company's suitcase - and there is also weight.
  • #14
    szczurekbuc
    Level 11  
    Hello
    during the modification, I used a weak transistor and after what 10 minutes of charging the charger was damaged. The Q1 transistor and the IC31 chip went. I have a question if any of you could read me the symbol of IC31. Thank you in advance for your answer.

    Best wishes