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Leaking water in a tin garage.

samsung18 44424 16
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  • #1
    samsung18
    Level 9  
    I have a tin garage on a concrete slab and when it rains the water flies in. What should I do with it? How to secure it?
  • #2
    Dacomos
    Level 33  
    samsung18 wrote:
    I have a tin garage on a concrete slab and when it rains the water flies inside what to do with it ?? how to secure it?



    The floor of the roof is leaking - fortune teller :-)
  • #3
    samsung18
    Level 9  
    Water enters between the spout and the lower angle.
  • #4
    Dacomos
    Level 33  
    Then there is linear drainage or digging of the garage.
  • #5
    samsung18
    Level 9  
    Leaking water in a tin garage.

    Added after 29 [seconds]:

    I've marked the place where the water enters.
  • #6
    wiene
    Level 12  
    Is the garage floor above the ground? - if so, it may be enough to seal the wall structure angle with the floor
  • #7
    adam 660
    Level 15  
    Forge concrete at an angle and place a galvanized sheet, bent on the back of the wall wave, and rivet it in the place where the wall is fastened so that water from the wall flows down onto the sheet and outside, not inside. Checked, dry inside - I also made a larger plate under the tin and the water was constantly leaking.
  • #8
    wiene
    Level 12  
    I just saw the photo - you need to seal the joints of the wall with a concrete slab.
  • #9
    samsung18
    Level 9  
    What can this connection be sealed with?
  • #10
    wiene
    Level 12  
    Solid plastic bituminous masses, eg Abizol G Tytan Professional, seal the entire garage around the perimeter.
  • #11
    samsung18
    Level 9  
    I have already lubricated with disperbit and nothing came of it, the water goes
    I am thinking of sticking the heat-sealable felt to the sheet
  • #12
    wiene
    Level 12  
    Bituminous masses, plastic stelae, e.g. Abizol G Tytan Professional, seal the entire garage around the perimeter - oki heat-welded roofing felt, but the walls are made of trapezoidal sheet metal and it will be difficult to place the roofing felt in the grooves of the sheet well
  • #13
    Alemucha
    Level 28  
    Quoting the poet "Water has it that it flows into the main river, to the Baltic Sea" - just convince her that flowing through your garage it will be uphill. A few cm of indoor floor is enough. I made a collar poured in the center around the perimeter of broken old asphalt, heated in a cauldron over the fire and a bit of a burner. But it can be concrete (the thickness of the profile that rivets the sheet)
  • #14
    evolution1
    Level 12  
    I have a question. I have a tinplate, but no door (I have it reported as a lamp). There is a draft on each side (gaps on the sides and back of the garage), yet water collects on the beams under the roof on cooler days. How to control it, the car is drenched daily with zinc rain :-) I read to stick with polystyrene or vapor-permeable foil, but how to stick these beams?
  • #15
    cezar80
    Level 27  
    Buy bitgum in a car and paint it around the garage both inside and out (the square that is wrong with the concrete) I had the same problem and had been in peace for a few years.
  • #16
    evolution1
    Level 12  
    Okay, but what will it be possible to paint the corner bead on the floor? Should I also paint these ceiling beams? I do not really understand.
  • #17
    Alemucha
    Level 28  
    evolution1 wrote:
    Okay, but what will you do by painting the angle bar?
    Thread.
    More would be to remove the condensation of water vapor from physics. If the mixture of steam and air hits a partition which is colder than itself, then we have water. It does not matter if the partition is called a leaf, grass, beetle's wing in the desert or a tin plate. Heat the baking tray and the problem will disappear :) . You can, of course, cover the whole with a nanotube membrane and drain them properly, but the cost will "slightly" exceed the price of the tinplate.