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I-beam selection - single-family house.

dav3y12 8154 8
This content has been translated flag-pl » flag-en View the original version here.
  • #1
    dav3y12
    Level 2  
    Hello

    I need help choosing an I-beam.

    Due to the fact that the ceiling of the building will be weighted (about 10 tons). It plans to strengthen it by making a note of one or more I-sections. (space in the suspended ceiling is quite limited, therefore it would be possible to use 2-3 I-sections with a better solution). The I-beam will be mounted on bearing walls.

    I-beam selection - single-family house.

    best regards
  • #2
    101pawel
    Level 28  
    dav3y12 wrote:
    I need help choosing an I-beam.
    Even if you provide the necessary details of the wall construction, and even if there are any cross-sections of these sections here, then these data will only become reliable when the person giving the answer gives them in writing, with their name, surname, signature and number of design rights.
    best regards
  • #3
    strucel
    Level 33  
    Precisely because there is no building permit requirement for many works does not mean that you can do them without a project. And the designer does the project by signing under them and taking responsibility for them, moreover, if he made a mistake he has compulsory insurance.
  • #4
    dav3y12
    Level 2  
    Hello

    Thank you for your comments, but assuming the thread I was counting on more specific information.

    Of course, I am aware of the designer's stamp is important, but I also carry out design work in a different area and I know what it looks like in practice, a person who has the rights, and often does not familiarize well with the design prepared by engineers. I still hope that someone who makes calculations instead of patting the stamps will speak.

    best regards
  • #5
    JacekCz
    Level 39  
    dav3y12 wrote:
    Hello

    Thank you for your comments, but assuming the thread I was counting on more specific information.


    WD-40 and Duct Tape

    helps for everything (according to practitioners)
  • #6
    ^ToM^
    Level 39  
    Try to count the beams yourself.
    You will read and it is not so difficult: http://belki.y0.pl/

    Approximately: for my house I used I-sections, height 160, width 74. Distance between supports 5. However, this is a normal, large house.
    These I-beams are spaced every 3 m.
    I hope this helps you.
    best regards
  • #7
    janek1815
    Level 38  
    Such examples can be multiplied in my farm building, the designer put 6.5 and 200 m beams on 300 m. The roof rests on them. There is no ceiling. A roof span of 25 m. Without calculations, none of this will happen. The second building was once adapted a long time ago, a span of 13 m was also 6.5 m under the supports and they are 100 I-sections. Only that probably nobody counted these because it was old times.
  • #8
    zimny8
    Level 33  
    The solution seems simple but it is not, just inserting beams requires knowledge and experience.

    We have many unknowns here, including:
    - thickness and reinforcement of the existing reinforced concrete slab
    - 2T support places on load-bearing walls with windows.
  • #9
    saskia
    Level 39  
    zimny8 wrote:
    The solution seems simple but it is not, just inserting beams requires knowledge and experience.

    We have many unknowns here, including:
    - thickness and reinforcement of the existing reinforced concrete slab
    - 2T support places on load-bearing walls with windows.

    These are the things that matter most.

    The entire existing structure is subject to calculations, not just the beams themselves.
    In addition to the fact that, for example, the existing floor alone may be adequate for half of the expected load, the places of supporting the beams may be too weak to support the remaining half of the load, and the beams themselves have their weight, and too heavy they add a load in themselves.
    Such, for example, brick posts between windows, they may be too weak and then you need not only to rebuild them from appropriate engineering brick, but also to check their foundation-foundation, and often even make a new one.
    The chain is as strong as its weakest link.
    Every building maintains itself by gravity, but the same gravity can destroy it if it is bypassed.
    The building is a whole, not just individual elements, and each conversion requires a recalculation of its elements in a new arrangement of forces.
    Having an original construction documentation not only facilitates calculations, but also allows you to quickly find the weak points for rework, because the designed and made strengths of individual elements are known.
    Any savings and deviations from the plans may be the cause of unforeseen problems during operation or modification.

    Moderated By ANUBIS:


    dav3y12 Last visit: 01 Dec 2017 12:17
    Author's lack of interest in the topic. close