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Condensate disposal (through evaporation)

Bartess 12501 16
This content has been translated flag-pl » flag-en View the original version here.
  • #1
    Bartess
    Level 12  
    Hi.
    I have air conditioning installed in the block. Outdoor unit on the balcony, drainage to the bucket. (2nd floor, there is no question of putting the pipe outside the balcony, there are no gutters within reach, currently no possibility of draining (pumping out) the condensate to the kitchen or bathroom (maybe someday generalce you could run a tube in the bathroom floor). Simply at this point, the bucket is the only (known to me) way out.
    I like to combine and I decided that since the outdoor unit is blowing with hot air, I found that I would check the evaporation efficiency. Briefly writing I did as shown in the picture below: I put the end of a tetras diaper into the outlet of the condensate tube (it perfectly collects moisture when wiped) and hung it ~ 50 cm in front of the air outlet with the unit. outside, putting the rest in the bucket. I admit that I have not yet measured the efficiency of this solution (due to lack of time), but the fact is that the water in the bucket arrives much slower. Not only that - for example yesterday morning there was ~ 4 cm of water in the bucket, the air conditioning was not turned on all day (there was no need to do so) and the bucket was dry until the evening.
    And here I have questions for professionals or imaginative guests (or both :) ): Are there any condensate evaporation systems used in professional air conditioning systems? (I've heard of sputtering but missed evaporation.)
    If I wanted to make a slightly better and more durable version of such an evaporator, do you have ideas how to possibly make it and from what material?
    At the moment, I have an idea to hang this tetra in such a way as to maximize its surface. wavy like a curtain (vertically) or in some way (e.g. on strings) horizontally. horizontal folds should be better as they will extend the vertical water path giving more time to evaporate.
    Please note that I do not want to use the outdoor unit cooler for water evaporation / disposal. I don't want to "interfere" with it.
    What do you think about such a "screwed up" idea? :-) .

    Condensate disposal (through evaporation)
  • #2
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #3
    Bartess
    Level 12  
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    Most often, in split systems, I saw the condensate drainage pipe outside, and the water was dripping.

    Unfortunately not an option (neighbors and stuff).
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:

    As an imaginative person, you may be able to pour the condensate over the radiator. It's hot so the water evaporates quickly and the fan blows everything out.

    I do not want to interfere with the external unit.
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:

    You can also make the water outside fall into something that breaks the drop (computer fan?) And then that water falls rather unnoticed in the form of a drizzle.

    Interesting idea!
  • #4
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #5
    freebsd
    Level 39  
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    You can also make the water outside fall into something that will break the drop (computer fan?) And then this water will fall rather unnoticed in the form of a drizzle
    I thought of an ultrasonic humidifier.
  • #6
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #7
    p.obelix
    Refrigeration equipment specialist
    Yes, such systems are used in refrigeration furniture. Instead of a diaper, there is something like a sponge. Air is sucked in through the sponge.
  • #8
    Bartess
    Level 12  
    I tested my owned today solution . In half an hour with naked 391 g of water dripped into the tubes and released after a rag it accumulated 269 g, which is 30% less. Today I also bought a balcony pot and spread out the rag, increasing the area more than twice. I have not fully tested this solution yet, but there was no water in the pot for several minutes of work. Now it remains only to wait for another hot day. If this solution works, I have an idea how to do it a bit more professionally .
    This is what version 2 looks like:
    Condensate disposal (through evaporation)

    If someone is interested in the topic, I can post updates :-) .
  • #9
    freebsd
    Level 39  
    Bartess wrote:
    If someone is interested in the topic, I can post updates.

    I will please :-)
  • #10
    Chris_W

    Level 38  
    Release the tube on the condenser fins (you can bend them a little for this need), there is hot metal and high airflow - it will evaporate instantly ;)
  • #11
    jack63
    Level 43  
    Chris_W wrote:
    Release the tube on the condenser fins (you can bend them a little for this need), there is hot metal and high airflow - it will evaporate instantly

    Great idea. As soon as the water evaporates, the efficiency of the device will increase.
    I would only suggest pouring the water through a sort of collector mounted on top of the condenser.
    Such a gutter with holes. The water will run in thin rivulets over the fins and will be sucked into the condenser. Buttonholes must be a lot or a brush.
  • #12
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #13
    jack63
    Level 43  
    It is no interference. And so it rains on her.
    With the rest of the heating, water will flow from the outdoor unit anyway, because it is defrosting every now and then.
  • #14
    Chris_W

    Level 38  
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    I suggested it right away:
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    As an imaginative person, you may be able to pour the condensate over the radiator. It's hot so the water evaporates quickly and the fan blows everything out.

    But the author denied the idea:
    Bartess wrote:
    I do not want to interfere with the external unit.

    We know that you proposed - there is a mass of Klim that is made like this - apparently the idea has been known for a long time.
    There is no interference here - the outlet of the tube should adjoin the lamellas (I would press it into the lamellas), and the water will be drawn in by the fan. You can make a collector that disperses water over a larger area - it is a matter of imagination and manual skills.
  • #15
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #16
    jack63
    Level 43  
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    Usually everything is in the housing, so bringing the tube would require a small fit of the housing by drilling a hole in it.

    Nothing needs to be drilled, and what for? You can use the screw holes for the cover fastening with the rest.
    Kraniec_Internetów wrote:
    assuming the indoor unit is higher than the outdoor unit. Otherwise it will be tough without a pump.

    Have you read
    Bartess wrote:
    Outdoor unit on the balcony, drainage to the bucket.

    Also an ideal situation for "pouring" on the condenser.
    A long, narrow brush would probably be best. Like for the door downstairs, but with long bristles. A sheet of metal, profiled to it, is screwed so that it constitutes a gutter at the top and below it touches the brush. Something like a question mark (?) In a cross section.
    Such a brush can be attached from the back even with adhesive tape or better with a long rubber band covering the entire cross-section of the air conditioner.
    It's easy to take it off in the winter, and you're in trouble.
    However, when heated, it will still flow from the outdoor unit, and this water is much more difficult to catch. It can also drip from the balcony to the neighbor below.
  • #17
    gag70
    Level 24  
    are there any condensate evaporation systems used in professional air conditioning systems? (I've heard of sputtering but missed evaporation.)
    ----------
    Apply. Evaporation with a heater. For example, in large crane air conditioners that run with pig iron ladles through the steelworks, they serve the operator's cabin and the electrical switchboard room.