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Is the AES-256 encryption method the most secure? There are test results

danielde 27517 11
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  • Is the AES-256 encryption method the most secure? There are test results
    The latest results were announced last week research cryptographic files that showed threats in the method encryption AES-256 data, used in most protected internet transactions and more. AES-256 (Advanced Encryption Standard) is a symmetric block cipher used since 2002 by the American NSA to secure confidential information. Currently, the title method also protects mass storage devices, payment transactions, wireless networks, cellular network connections and a number of other applications.

    AES-256 is usually based on a 256-bit encryption key (it is possible to use 128- and 192-bit keys), which can only be cracked by the so-called brute force attack. However, the number of possibilities to check - 2 ^ 256 - is greater than the number of atoms in the universe.



    However, scientists say the algorithm is "unreliable" and has "certification flaws". According to them, the data encryption process does not handle certification well when the content of an encrypted message can be read in less time than checking all possible keys. However, like the alleged gaps found in AES-256 translate into online transactions? The media reports that scientists have found a way to break AES that is 3 to 5 times faster than earlier methods. At this point, it is worth mentioning that the recent attacks were part of a program implemented by Microsoft and a Belgian university famous for designing and analyzing cryptographic algorithms.

    To be realistic, any attempt to decrypt information protected by AES-256 would take several times longer than the existence of the universe. So reducing this period of time by three or even five times is billions of years anyway, which is in fact an absolutely impractical solution. Even the largest botnet discovered in the world with 30 million computers would not be able to cope with an attack on AES-256 encryption.

    So it can be concluded that these findings are interesting, but a lot of time and work is still needed to seriously think about the fact that AES encryption is dangerous. For now, this is it the safest information encryption method.

    Source: Link

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    danielde
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  • #2
    ^Rachel
    Level 21  
    very interesting article. Out of curiosity, I checked 2 ^ 256 = 1.158e + 77

    though I believe every cipher is crackable.
  • #3
    marmon
    Level 17  
    ^Rachel wrote:
    very interesting article. Out of curiosity, I checked 2 ^ 256 = 1.158e + 77

    though I believe every cipher is crackable.


    there is but it will take a long time, the easiest way to break a human is and this is what hacking and data theft are all about now
  • #4
    User removed account
    User removed account  
  • #5
    Szymon Tarnowski
    Level 27  
    ^Rachel wrote:
    very interesting article. Out of curiosity, I checked 2 ^ 256 = 1.158e + 77
    though I believe every cipher is crackable.
    You have a calculation error, the bruteforce calculation time is calculated taking into account 50% of the checking time of all combinations. ;)
    Statistically NOW :D after 50% of attempts the key is broken.
  • #6
    nibbit
    Level 20  
    Quote:
    Is the AES-256 encryption method the most secure?


    I can not cut it, but AES did not win the competition because it was the safest (because other algorithms offered security at the same level) but because of a compromise between its security and ease of implementation on digital machines.

    Such a small offtop for rectification :) .

    Although the article is interesting, I would not be afraid that it will change something in the near future. The technique is moving forward, which is a problem to extend the key by further bits :) .
  • #7
    User removed account
    User removed account  
  • #8
    ~ReverseEsper
    Level 15  
    According to Wikipedia, the VMPC function is MOSTLY a one-way function. Until they are sure about it, they are unlikely to use the algorithm. But in fact, the implementation of the algorithm looks very nice.

    Not to mention that there is a fee to use the VMPC
  • #9
    seba_x
    Level 31  
    Szymon Tarnowski wrote:
    ^Rachel wrote:
    very interesting article. Out of curiosity, I checked 2 ^ 256 = 1.158e + 77
    though I believe every cipher is crackable.
    You have a calculation error, the bruteforce calculation time is calculated taking into account 50% of the checking time of all combinations. ;)
    Statistically NOW :D after 50% of attempts the key is broken.


    And if you are lucky, you can break the code the first time (computing), just like you can play with the totek your whole life and miss nothing, or the first time and a six at once ;-)
  • #10
    tangofox
    Level 14  
    what parts of the TCP / IP protocol does AES work on? On IP datagrams, Packets or Frames?
  • #11
    fred24
    Level 11  
    Will reheat the chop, what does this encryption look like today? has already been broken? are there any methods to decrypt aes-encrypted photos via ransomware?
  • #12
    Szymon Tarnowski
    Level 27  
    fred24 wrote:
    Will reheat the chop, what does this encryption look like today? has already been broken? are there any methods to decrypt aes-encrypted photos via ransomware?
    If the structure of the ransmomware is cryptographically correct (e.g. secure creation of a random key) then it cannot be broken.