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Internet via coaxial (TV) cable

drail 20916 24
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  • #1
    drail
    Level 10  
    Hello, I have a question that bothers me terribly, namely, I would like to play the Internet on the TV cable. Is such a thing even possible?
    In theory, this is to be used to watch movies on raspberry. One router that would get the signal after rj45 and put it on the antenna cable, and the other one would convert from the antenna to the rj45. If this is not possible, maybe someone knows a cool router that has good wifi transmission? Client mode only, doesn't need to broadcast wifi, it would be great if it had OpenWrt support.
    Do you have a problem with Raspberry? Ask question. Visit our forum Raspberry.
  • #2
    simirecki
    Level 11  
    Too many combinations with coaxial cable.
    If in doubt about WiFi coverage, just pull the twisted pair. If it is not possible to route the twisted pair, use a WiFi signal repeater. All other combinations will incur costs, with no guarantee that it will work.
  • #3
    drail
    Level 10  
    Wifi is not working right now. I have a Tp link Wr740n with openwrt, the video is cutting, it is impossible to watch. There is no twisted pair option. I am looking for some other solution. I must admit that I would be satisfied with a twist solution, then wifi and finally a concentrate. But after wifi, I'm not sure if it will work.
  • #4
    Kroovka
    Level 23  
    drail wrote:
    Hello, I have a question that bothers me terribly, namely, I would like to play the Internet on the TV cable. Is such a thing even possible?


    Of course it is possible. Many cable TVs provide internet, television and telephone in this way. However, I will not give my colleague the types of devices used to encode the signal in this way because I have never implemented such a solution.
  • #6
    drail
    Level 10  
    Thank you very much. It's always a lead. But there is maybe a cheaper option?
  • #7
    Kroovka
    Level 23  
    drail wrote:
    Thank you very much. It's always a lead. But there is maybe a cheaper option?


    Or maybe it is better to use modulators to transmit data through the 230V mains instead of playing with concentrators? It is not a very expensive solution.
  • #8
    drail
    Level 10  
    Plc is out. I tried, YouTube starts, but HD movies don't.
  • Helpful post
    #9
    seb235
    Level 28  
    The solution you are writing about is already known and sold, for example, by the netgear company: http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-MCAB1001-Coax-Ethernet-Adapter-Black/dp/B001N85NMI or other with MoCA technology, allow you to connect the equipment via a cable coaxial, but is it worth spending so much money on it? In my opinion no. Remember also that MoCA solutions only work in conjunction with cable, they cannot be used, for example, with satellite TV.

    As for the PCL adapters, they work great, but just like everything on the market, they cost money. If someone buys an adapter for PLN 50 and expects miracles, let it fall to the ground.

    You can also use VDSL adapters and create a network on current telephone cables and theoretically have 100Mbit / s in both directions, but they are also not cheap.

    @drail My advice is simple and basically the best and the cheapest. Buy an ordinary twisted-pair cable as many meters as you need with a little margin and lead it so that it does not become visible and the problem is solved. The price is not high per meter of cable, it is only PLN 1, you will spend one day and arrange it somehow because it is not a thick cable. Spending an additional cash, and not a small one, because about PLN 600, no matter which solution you choose, is completely unnecessary, unless you throw the cash down the drain.

    When making a network at home, you have to remember to do it once, but properly, and with sensible equipment. Then everything flickers nicely for years and we can practically forget about its existence because it works maintenance-free.
  • #10
    drail
    Level 10  
    @ seb235
    From what you write, I will really let go of the concentrate. I will be more interested in plc. I have one adapters but they are quite old (3-4 years old, devolo dlan 85 hsmini) what do you suggest with the new PCL?
    I will not pass the twisted pair for 2 floors, I do not have it, there is no room for it in the walls.
  • Helpful post
    #11
    seb235
    Level 28  
    As for the PCL adapters, I recommend that you check in stores what is available, then enter their model in YouTube and see how they perform in individual tests and which one will be the best for you. Also remember that the speed given on the box is usually purely theoretical and (especially with cheap equipment) it drastically decreases with each successive meter of the cable.
  • #12
    drail
    Level 10  
    I think I will be looking for Devolo the most because they have probably the best data transfer technology. Interestingly, they work even on different phases, but slowly but still.
  • #13
    NAXIN
    Level 22  
    To the concentration camp. I don't know what price range you are interested in. I found such an HPNA 3.1 compatible bridge for $ 40 Link . What signal would you possibly like to share this concentrator with?

    My friend seb235 I can see you are on the topic. Do you have any nice graph showing frequency overlap with different standards?
    MoCA, HPNA, HomeplugAV, G.hn, DOCSIS etc? I would save it in my favorites ;)
  • #14
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #15
    NAXIN
    Level 22  
    jurek.adam wrote:
    How do you want to connect the network without CMTS (it costs a lot of money) to have internet there? Wi-Fi is real, or even a twisted pair network. You can forget about the concentrate, in any case the costs will not be digestible for such modest, home applications.


    The idea is to send Ethernet frames through a medium which is a concentration between floors.
    If ethernet is built, we smuggle in the frame what we want ... e.g. ip and tcp and we have internet.
    It won't work according to you?
  • #16
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #17
    NAXIN
    Level 22  
    jurek.adam wrote:
    It is not known what this coaxial cable (or at least 75? ;) what length, what is the attenuation, and you want to do a network with a return path on random devices, which does not make any sense, especially economically.


    I guess it is not about an economic sense, but an aesthetic one ;) Look at staircases in blocks, each tenant at a different supplier has a different service and the ceiling looks like Swiss cheese :) I, too, as the creator of the theme, would rather use the existing infrastructure than run a new bundle. Nevertheless, we know nothing about the concentration except that it is.
  • #18
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #19
    deus.ex.machina
    Level 32  
    In an act of desperation you can give diplexers (or splitters / combiner) and use a WLAN card (both sides) - this will probably be the cheapest solution compatible (almost in the case of 2.4GHz) with SAT.
  • #20
    nasty_photon
    Level 22  
    How long is this length of coaxial cable? And is it in one piece?
    What can be done on a trial basis - because it can work - is to connect two WIFI routers in bridge mode with a coaxial cable. Such tplink WR340G by. specification has power
    EIRP at the level of
  • #21
    deus.ex.machina
    Level 32  
    nasty_photon wrote:
    Such tplink WR340G by. specification has power
    EIRP at the level of
  • #22
    nasty_photon
    Level 22  
    deus.ex.machina wrote:
    nasty_photon wrote:
    Such tplink WR340G by. specification has power
    EIRP at the level of
  • #23
    deus.ex.machina
    Level 32  
    nasty_photon wrote:

    They are powered by plug-in power supplies, so they are galvanically isolated from the mains. And probably RJ-45 sockets have transformers, so there should be no problem with different potentials after Ethernet. As long as the coaxial cable is intact and there is no short circuit somewhere.


    He writes about the solution of the input / output stage in the WLAN card - normally it is adapted to connect the antenna, not the coaxial cable of a considerable length, which is also used by other devices and which may have a destructive potential. Therefore, you should take care of galvanic separation (a simple circuit with a diode limiter and capacitors - you can immediately switch from SMA to F and add two resistors to make a matching pad - 25 ohm in series.)
  • #24
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #25
    deus.ex.machina
    Level 32  
    KrzysztofS wrote:

    Ps. Neither capacitors or diodes will provide galvanic isolation ;)


    Maybe a colleague elaborate on this thought - perhaps the producers of many devices simply do not know something that the colleague knows about?