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Thor ST100X - Drum not turning when fully loaded with clothes

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  • Level 2  
    Hi everyone,

    I hope someone can give me some pointers here. I have an old washing machine, a Thor ST100X, which was working fine until recently. It must be at least 15 years old. When I select any program and put half a load of clothes, it works fine, but when I put a full load of clothes and select any program, the drum does not spin at high speed. Clothes are soaked wet. It looks like it's too heavy tfor the drum to turn at high speed whereas it used to work before. The strangest thing is that the button starts to move by itself (see video). To "solve" this, I have to unload some clothes and rerun the spin feature so clothes get dried.

    Thanks for your help on this.
    [img-0]


    Thor ST100X - Drum not turning when fully loaded with clothes

  • Home appliances specialist
    Where does the knob go? Does it stay in any position or does it go round in a circle?
  • Level 37  
    The washing machine has no spin speed control, so there is probably a capacitor about 15 uF from the motor, it is worth checking its capacity or replacing it with a new one.
    :arrow: I have corrected TONI_2003
  • Home appliances specialist
    The fact that there is no speed control of the centrifuge does not prove the type of motor used. There is a brush motor in this washing machine and it is in vain to look for a capacitor.
  • Level 9  
    If it's a brush motor, check the brushes. When they run out, the engine will rotate, but it won't have the right power and won't go into high speed. Check that there is no spark at the point of contact between the brushes and the commutator. With each start it will get worse and worse until it stops working - the brush will stop sticking, the tight "copper" power supply will not allow it. Salvation: replace the brush with a new one.
    Temporary rescue: you can solder this copper by loosening the tight copper, thereby ensuring the brush adheres to the commutator.
    After washing, buy new brushes and replace them. There is a probability of damage to the commutator when the brush wears even more and rubs against it with copper.
    And as for the rotating programmer knob, I am not speaking because I have not had such a case yet.
  • Home appliances specialist
    Unix136 wrote:
    Temporary rescue: you can solder this copper by loosening the tight copper, thereby ensuring the brush adheres to the commutator.

    And just wait for the meat on the brush to run out and the wire will fly over the commutator ...

    Unix136 wrote:
    And as for the rotating programmer knob, I am not speaking because I have not had such a case yet.

    This is normal and common for this design.

    It seems to me that the author has already ignored the topic, I don't think he has done anything about it for two weeks ...
  • Level 9  
    mrice wrote:
    And just wait for the meat on the brush to run out and the wire will fly over the commutator ...


    This is also what I wrote about it: ... :)

    Unix136 wrote:
    After washing, buy new brushes and replace them. There is a probability of damage to the commutator when the brush wears even more and rubs against it with copper.


    ... maybe washing in hand :)
  • Home appliances specialist
    Unix136 wrote:
    mrice wrote:
    And just wait for the meat on the brush to run out and the wire will fly over the commutator ...


    This is also what I wrote about it: ... :)


    For the future, you'd better not give such ideas to people.