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Danfoss thermostatic head in block

m4xon 5301 15
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  • #1
    m4xon
    Level 15  
    Hi,

    I live in a block built in the 90s. Two years ago, I replaced the cast iron radiators with Purmo plate radiators, additionally Danfoss valves and thermostatic heads are installed. I have a question about the principle of operation of the heads. Namely, does program 3 mean a specific temperature? I have the impression that this head works as an open closed principle, I set 3 and nothing heats up, and how 5 goes. I don't quite understand how it works and could there be a problem with the installation?

    Thanks
  • Helpful post
    #2
    gimak
    Level 40  
    m4xon wrote:
    I have the impression that this head works as an open closed principle, I set 3 and nothing heats up, and how 5 goes.

    You see you have a higher temperature in the room than the "3" assigned to the head and therefore it does not open.
  • #3
    adamkowalski431
    Level 15  
    Open the window in the room and it will start to heat you up.
  • #4
    m4xon
    Level 15  
    and do these numbers have specific temperatures assigned to them?
  • Helpful post
    #5
    adamkowalski431
    Level 15  
    So check the pages of Danfos, maybe you can dig up something
  • #6
    kierbedz4
    Level 36  
    At a temperature of about 8 degrees in the room, the thermostatic valve will open automatically to prevent the radiator from freezing. Before venting the room, the valve should be closed.
  • #9
    Zbigniew Rusek
    Level 37  
    One more thing (quite important). Are the heads mounted horizontally? They should be horizontal, as the thermostatic head mounted vertically upwards will cause heat from the power sprig to heat the head and give a false interpretation of the room temperature.
  • #10
    BUCKS
    Level 39  
    m4xon wrote:
    and do these numbers have specific temperatures assigned to them?

    As far as I remember, 3 is the equivalent of about 20 degrees.
    You just have to remember that the thermostatic head "measures" the temperature at the radiator.
    For example, if you have a window sill too low over the radiator, it may be too warm near the head and then the head will close or close the radiator completely, and you will have a lower temperature in the depths of the room.
    It is best to do tests with a thermometer in the room, then you will see how much the setting of 3 on the head really gives you.
  • #11
    Zbigniew Rusek
    Level 37  
    BUCKS wrote:
    m4xon wrote:
    and do these numbers have specific temperatures assigned to them?

    As far as I remember, 3 is the equivalent of about 20 degrees.
    You just have to remember that the thermostatic head "measures" the temperature at the radiator.
    For example, if you have a window sill too low over the radiator, it may be too warm near the head and then the head will close or close the radiator completely, and you will have a lower temperature in the depths of the room.
    It is best to do tests with a thermometer in the room, then you will see how much the setting of 3 on the head really gives you.
    The head cannot be behind the curtain either, because the curtain causes the heat from the radiator to be "trapped" between the curtain and the glass, so it is hot there, the head senses it and shuts off the inflow of the heating medium. In general, it should not cover the radiators (curtains - yes, but to the window sill).
  • #12
    BUCKS
    Level 39  
    Zbigniew Rusek wrote:
    The head cannot be behind the curtain either, because the curtain causes the heat from the radiator to be "trapped" between the curtain and the glass, so it is hot there, the head senses it and shuts off the inflow of the heating medium. In general, it should not cover the radiators (curtains - yes, but to the window sill).

    In exceptional situations, if there is no option to discover the thermostatic head, you can use a head with a capillary, i.e. a wire 1.5-2 m long at the end of which there is a temperature sensor. Then the head can be covered, because the temperature on the external sensor is taken into account, i.e. the sensor must be mounted in an open place at a suitable height for the radiator to properly heat the room.
    There is always a way out of a given situation, but the capillary head is more expensive than the usual one.
  • #13
    Zbigniew Rusek
    Level 37  
    BUCKS wrote:
    Zbigniew Rusek wrote:
    The head cannot be behind the curtain either, because the curtain causes the heat from the radiator to be "trapped" between the curtain and the glass, so it is hot there, the head senses it and shuts off the inflow of the heating medium. In general, it should not cover the radiators (curtains - yes, but to the window sill).

    In exceptional situations, if there is no option to discover the thermostatic head, you can use a head with a capillary, i.e. a wire 1.5-2 m long at the end of which there is a temperature sensor. Then the head can be covered, because the temperature on the external sensor is taken into account, i.e. the sensor must be mounted in an open place at a suitable height for the radiator to properly heat the room.
    There is always a way out of a given situation, but the capillary head is more expensive than the usual one.
    And it is not always commercially available.
  • #14
    leso
    Level 10  
    I understand that you shouldn't cover the thermostatic head during the day when I don't want the heat to be wasted, but am I not logically saying that it might make sense at night? If I cover the window with a curtain at night, then the head will automatically let less heat through the valve into the radiator and I am walking at night. This way I don't have to "screw" the head on before the night. If I am wrong, please pay attention to me.
  • #15
    BUCKS
    Level 39  
    leso wrote:
    If I cover the window with a curtain at night, then the head will automatically let less heat through the valve into the radiator and I am walking at night. This way I don't have to "screw" the head on before the night. If I am wrong, please pay attention to me.

    But you have to cover or expose the head on purpose, so what's the difference to potentially screwing the head on.
    This is probably why you bought a thermostatic head to set the temperature relatively precisely, and now having this head you do not want to use it properly.
    If you don't want to shoot, buy yourself electronic heads and program temperatures for specific hours, the head will automatically change the settings.
    For now, I use a constant temperature of 20 degrees for 24 hours on the room regulator and 2 heaters are without heads, and in the remaining ones I set 21, 21.5 degrees on the head and I do not turn anything.
    The temperature is between 20.1-20.8 degrees depending on the room and I'm not shooting anything.
    My regulator does not allow me to precisely set a higher temperature, so I am not trying to do so, because the constant temperature seems optimal to me.