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How to connect two wires together?

ghost666 45135 50
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • #31
    kkkamil
    Level 13  
    What do you think about connecting lines with crimp ferrules? And then, of course, the thermo tube. It is about connecting both 230V and low voltage cables - e.g. temperature sensors.

    Best regards.
  • #32
    SylwekK
    Level 31  
    spec220 wrote:
    To be honest, this is the first time I have met on the forum a person who welds the installation at home, and for the first time someone who saves time and money on renovation in their OWN HOME

    Buddy, you're twisting the meaning of my speech a little. You still do not accept that the welded connection is reliable, because you simply did not do it and you DO NOT KNOW (not only you) how it should be done correctly ... As I wrote in my father, for 40 years even the light bulb did not flash due to "backlash". This is not the first time someone who does differently does not acknowledge that there are other faster and more efficient installation methods, and at the same time do not write to me about saving, because I have already improved economical installations and to this day they are grateful to me for it, because after other electricians who repaired by traditional methods, the problem returned after a month or so while baking pancakes :)
    I don't have to prove to you that the welded connection is the safest. There is NO chance of sparking a connection that will not be fully provided by a cube, twisted pair or even ordinary soldering if the tin melts under the influence of temperature, and I have already encountered something like this (probably this is what your spring is for, which is to protect against it). Can there be anything better in this situation for conductivity in a given material than permanent contact of two identical materials over a relatively large surface? If you say that it may be otherwise, take the measurements yourself and see for yourself :)
    Aaaa, and you have never seen something like this in installations, because you just rotate in other circles :)
    I will have a moment, maybe I will insert a short video on how this connection is properly made.
  • #33
    spec220
    Level 24  
    SylwekK wrote:
    There is NO chance of sparking at the connection, which cannot be fully provided by cube, twisted pair or even ordinary soldering, if the tin melts under the influence of temperature


    Before the tin Sn99Cu1 is melted in a professionally made coupler, the insulation and the cable itself will hit the trail sooner.

    SylwekK wrote:
    because after other electricians who repaired traditional methods, the problem returned after a month or so while baking pancakes

    SylwekK wrote:
    which a cube, twisted pair or even simple soldering will not fully provide, if the tin melts under the influence of temperature


    Having in mind the service of the oven itself, I will admit that my friend is right (the tin can melt with the heater, and therefore the factory welds, and the service welds the heater's outputs)

    SylwekK wrote:
    (this is probably what your spring is for to protect against it).


    The spring is there to significantly increase the conductive surface of the electrical connection and the strength of the moss.

    SylwekK wrote:
    If you say that it may be otherwise, take the measurements yourself and see for yourself


    I know how the short-circuit loop impedance of an overheated cable comes out, as is the case with a welded joint of thin copper wires. (for a colleague, twisted wires provide good conductivity, not the welded end itself)

    SylwekK wrote:
    Aaaa, and you have never seen something like this in installations, because you just rotate in other circles


    Perhaps. Here you twist with pliers, and then the whole thing is poured over with solder. Even if the tin melted, the wires are still twisted and conduct electricity well (personally, I also add a spring). And in order for the tin to melt, the entire cable must be overloaded 5-8 times, which is protected by safety devices. And if the protection fails, then your welding will be useless either, because the cable will burn.
  • #34
    clubber84
    Level 27  
    But buddy @ spec220 , no additional filler is used for welding, only two twisted copper wires are fused together along the entire length of the "twisted pair", not the end itself.
  • #35
    spec220
    Level 24  
    clubber84 wrote:
    no additional filler is used for welding, but two twisted copper wires are fused together along the entire length of the "strand".


    That is why the veins overheat at a certain distance.

    clubber84 wrote:
    it only fuses two twisted copper wires along the entire length of the "twisted pair", not the end itself.


    in the photo posted by @S SylekK the tip itself is melted
  • #36
    miroslaw wielki
    Conditionally unlocked
    You can also weld with a laser.
  • #37
    pawel1148
    Level 22  
    kkkamil wrote:
    What do you think about connecting lines with crimp ferrules? And then, of course, the thermo tube. It is about connecting both 230V and low voltage cables - e.g. temperature sensors.

    I really don't like the use of crimp ferrules. WAGO prefers to connect lines. There is too much fun with the sleeves, then the effect is usually weak and I have to do it all over again. Maybe I'm doing something wrong. I do not know. I do not trust 2 wires in 1 sleeve (most often it does not withstand a tear test). I try to avoid connecting wires like fire.

    I sometimes use crimp sleeves to connect the cord to various types of devices with various clamps. And here comes my question.
    What methods do you use to connect the cable to e.g. a relay?
    I am happy when I only have a line in the signal wires, then I can allow myself to tin-plated and not use sleeves, to which I am a bit allergic (because to do it well, it takes me 3 times longer than tinning). And then it turns out that the clamp of the apparatus is not adapted to accept the sleeve.

    Second question: How do you handle the connection of, for example, 3 wires in the switchgear?
    WAGO seems to be the answer to how to do it at a reasonable price and form, but I have seen few such boxes. In addition, WAGO is only suitable for small cross sections. At higher currents, there are ZUGs, but I have never seen someone in the box on them somehow cleverly solved the connection of, for example, 3 wires with higher cross-sections. These flat connectors are quite often used on fuses, but the wires are not always separated here.
  • #38
    spec220
    Level 24  
    pawel1148 wrote:
    I sometimes use crimp sleeves to connect the cord to various types of devices with various clamps. And here comes my question.
    What methods do you use to connect the cable to e.g. a relay?


    Signal or control cables? I have never had major problems with it (robot sleeves go much faster compared to whitening each vein separately)
    Enough:
    - The right press
    - Adequate pressure force (if there is adjustment)
    - proper selection of the right sleeves (presses with a "square" crimp and a greater cross-section of the sleeve onto a smaller strand, and then there may be a problem with inserting the tip under the clamp of the device)

    pawel1148 wrote:
    somehow he solved the connection of, for example, 3 cables with higher cross-sections.


    There are various bridges to connect larger cross-sections of conductors (for TH-35 bus and screwed) just look for
  • #39
    Grzegorz_madera
    Level 35  
    pawel1148 wrote:
    then I can allow myself to tin-plated and not to use sleeves, to which I am a bit allergic (because to do it well, it takes me 3 times longer than tinning

    And I did exactly the opposite. I used to tin tips, now I have switched to sleeves. I have a press that clamps into a hexagon and no problem. And the robot goes 3 times faster than soldering. Good tin also costs its own, and the sleeves are cheaper. For example, for 1.5 mm? I pay 2.8 PLN / 100 pcs.
  • #40
    metalMANiu
    Level 19  
    pawel1148 wrote:
    In addition, WAGO is only suitable for small cross sections. At higher currents, there are ZUGs, but I have never seen someone in the box on them somehow cleverly solved the connection of, for example, 3 wires with higher cross-sections.

    They are WAGO with a lever version up to 6mm2 and current up to 32A. Not much change compared to 4mm2, but still.
    If you are a pedant, there are DIN rail mounts in which you put WAGO (but only those up to 4mm2).
  • #41
    miroslaw wielki
    Conditionally unlocked
    Finish this topic now, because it no longer leads to anything but an ego-raising towards others.
  • #42
    Piotrek#G
    Level 26  
    metalMANiu wrote:
    They are WAGO with a lever version up to 6mm2 and current up to 32A. Not much change compared to 4mm2, but still.
    If you are a pedant, there are DIN rail mounts in which you put WAGO (but only those up to 4mm2).

    After all, there are Wago connectors designed for direct mounting on a DIN rail, up to 35mm? and with a current of 85A.
  • #43
    metalMANiu
    Level 19  
    Piotrek#G wrote:
    metalMANiu wrote:
    They are WAGO with a lever version up to 6mm2 and current up to 32A. Not much change compared to 4mm2, but still.
    If you are a pedant, there are DIN rail mounts in which you put WAGO (but only those up to 4mm2).

    After all, there are Wago connectors designed for direct mounting on a DIN rail, up to 35mm? and with a current of 85A.


    Sure, but we talked about WAGO with a lever.
  • #45
    alfazulu
    Level 7  
    I do not use any cubes and other inventions. Simple twisted pair and insulation meet all the requirements
  • #46
    kotbury
    Gantry automation specialist
    I'm for. Wago may be simple to apply, but it takes up a lot of space (someone try to fit 4 Wago connectors connecting 4 cables by 4 wires in a standard flush-mounted box), besides, it is a flexible connector - susceptible to loosening.
  • #47
    miroslaw wielki
    Conditionally unlocked
    Now sometimes the strands are pushed with a hammer with a handle. I solder the strands.
  • #48
    Piotrek#G
    Level 26  
    kotbury wrote:
    Besides, it is a flexible joint - susceptible to loosening.

    Probably the elastic connection is more resistant to loosening. The spring ensures constant pressure all the time, compensating for any looseness that may result from various reasons.
  • #49
    alfazulu
    Level 7  
    Good soldering also meets the requirements, but I still prefer the so-called fishing twisted pair, it will break or loosen only when short-circuited
  • #50
    SylwekK
    Level 31  
    alfazulu wrote:
    it will not break or loosen until a short circuit occurs

    Well, the welded one will not loosen even with vibration, let alone short circuit :)
  • #51
    alfazulu
    Level 7  
    maybe that's right, but so far I have not seen a welded installation, I will stay with my twisted pair, for example, such insulation for insulation / fishing knot / passes the exam and failure-free