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New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

phanick 3969 6
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  • New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)
    Admission
    Recently, an interesting console fell into my hands - Daryar DY-636N. I gave it the nickname "Mini NES" because at first glance it looks very similar to the original NES. Only a closer comparison reveals that it is slightly smaller and lower. Its extraordinary advantage is that it has two cartridge slots - a standard Pegasus 60 pin (on the top) and a NES 72 pin (on the front). Inside the console, there is also a third 60-pin socket to accommodate a PCB with a built-in assembly, but it was empty.
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    The next difference is the construction of the 72 pin cartridge socket - in NES it is the so-called shelf (ZIF - Zero Insert Force), which requires pressing down after inserting the cartridge. Here we have a standard edge socket, but angular
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    In the past, I even came across something very similar, only with a single 72 pin socket, but inside there were integrated circuits and a game component integrated with the motherboard: https://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?t=19027

    Unfortunately, the console that is the hero of this thread turned out to be damaged - the voltage measurement on the damaged (most likely after connecting the power supply with wrong polarity) stabilizer 7805 on the output side showed approx. on the gluta-main processor only additionally confirmed this belief)

    However, it was very important for me to save her. Due to the unusual housing, the only option was to make the motherboard from scratch on the chips. By the way, I recreated the motherboard diagram:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    and plates with sockets:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Usually, in this type of schematic I omitted the modulator completely, but for some time I started to be interested in how they are built and I encountered several different, more and less complex designs.

    Motherboard design
    Making motherboards from scratch to consoles is - you might say - my bread and butter.
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    I usually use my proven scheme and mosaic of tracks and only slightly adjust it to some housing (e.g. by moving mounting holes, pad sockets, power sockets, power / reset buttons or audio and video sockets). Here, of course, we had to add a second cartridge slot (which was a minor concern, because the pinout of this slot is basically a mirror image of the 60-pin pinout). A minor macro is that the pins' raster is 2.5 mm, not 2.54 mm as for the 60 pin socket, which involved the necessity of constantly switching between millimeters and mils in the Eagl to run the track once centrally between the pins of the 60 pin connector, and then centrally between the pins of the 72 pin connector.

    The bigger worry was that behind the cartridge slots, where there are RAM memories in the above projects, there was no more space in this console. I had the idea to divide the PCB into two parts and place one under the other, but I decided not to "choke" and put everything on one. This required replacing the narrow RAM with wider ones, so I could run a small highway of paths underneath them.
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)
    However, I was not entirely satisfied with this solution - just compare the number of vias in this and previous boards around RAM. This clearly confirms that the optimal place for these memories is behind the sockets.

    The last fitting (I had the greatest concern that the places for the ginazda pads and cartridge slots would match the appropriate holes in the housing):
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    The tiles came out great:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    The only problematic place (which even Eagle warned about) was below - I had to cut the slight indigestion of the pad tracks with a knife. Well, here are two tracks of 0.01 mils between 1.5 mm pads (bigger than standard Eagle pads from scalers), which is 0.006mils of clearance.
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Expansion slot
    The keen reader will notice that there is a mysterious 2x8 goldpin socket on the board. In a word of explanation - consoles have two several-bit input ports (available at addresses $ 4016 and $ 4017) with their clock signals ($ 4016.CLK / $ 4017.CLK) and a three-bit output port (OUT0, OUT1, OUT2). Different accessories use different lines as shown in the table below
    Code:

                               | $4016 $4016 $4016 $4016 | $4017 $4017 $4017 $4017 4017 $4017 | OUT2 OUT1 OUT0 | Uwagi
                               |    .2    .1    .0  .CLK |    .4    .3    .2    .1   .0  .CLK |                |
    ---------------------------+-------------------------|------------------------------------+----------------|---
    Joystick gracza 1          |                 x     x |                                    |              x |
    Joystick gracza 2          |                         |                            x     x |              x |
    Standardowy pistolet       |                         |     x     x                        |                |
    Joystick gracza 3          |           x           x |                                    |              x |
    Joystick gracza 4          |                         |                       x          x |              x |
    Klawiatura Family BASIC    |                         |     x     x     x     x            |    x    x    x |


    In all NES clones of this type, only the lines: $ 4016.0, $ 4016.CLK, $ 4017.4, $ 4017.3, $ 4017.0, $ 4017.CLK, OUT0, required by pads 1, 2 and the pistol are shown. However, in the original famicom (and most of the better pegasuses) all lines are output (available on the 15-pin expansion port). I also decided to lead them out on the connector in order to be able to connect them with tape to an additional connector later.

    After soldering, everything worked from the first time
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Doting the "i" was just:
    * making plugs for the POWER and RESET buttons (previously the wires were permanently soldered to the board)
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    * replacement of the original heat sink from the stabilizer to a larger one (the console on scalakch requires much more electricity = much more heat):
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Mistakes
    I didn't manage to avoid a few faux-paux though:
    1. Sockets of the rainfall No. 1 and the rainfall number 2 were mistakenly changed with each other
    2. I led the paths to the pads from both sockets so that they had to be soldered from the "elements" side (they were also like that on the original, damaged PCB). Here I came up with the idea of drilling small holes next to the holes for the legs and passing them wires that would connect the layers to be able to solder the legs of the sockets from the other side:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)
    3. Once I got a cable with a socket for connecting the 15-pin expansion port, I noticed that the plug was too high, so the casing would not close, because just above the socket in the upper part of the casing there is a flat "cage" in which the cartridge is placed:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    I thought a bit about how to solve it, until I came up with the idea of replacing the previously made plug with an IDC plug, which is 1-2 millimeters lower:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Additional ports
    Going to the store on a bicycle 30 km one way, I had some time to think. I thought about why I should only output a 15-pin expansion port, if you would need more adapters if you wanted to connect standard pegasus pads. And so I figured out that I would output all 4 possible combinations at once: player 1 - port 9 and 15 pin and player 2 - port 9 and 15 pin. The 15 pin port from player 2 also functions as an expansion port.
    I was wondering how and where to place these ports (all next to each other, one below the other). After all, it turned out to be a natural place where the last free space inside the case was. So I made a suitable board to which I could connect the IDC tape with a previously designated socket:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)


    It took me about 2 hours to cut the right place in the casing (I tried a cutter, a manual file, and finally a mini-disc saved me from a dremel). And since I was already drilling well after midnight, from this place I would like to heartily greet my neighbors:
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N) New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Finally, however, a console was created that allows you to connect any type of pad (7, 9, 15 pin) and any type of cartridge (60 pin and 72 pin):
    New life of the old unique mini NES console (DY-636N)

    Cool! Ranking DIY
    Can you write similar article? Send message to me and you will get SD card 64GB.
    About Author
    phanick
    Level 28  
    Offline 
    phanick wrote 2377 posts with rating 2373, helped 54 times. Live in city Warszawa. Been with us since 2007 year.
  • #2
    398216 Usunięty
    Level 43  
    "The new life of the console case ..." should be.
    Anyway, you did a pretty good job. Practically from scratch and harder because you had to adjust to the existing housing. I do not know if I would like to, because consoles have never been my hobby, and I do not like playing too much. But - whoever prefers what. In any case, I appreciate the input and the end result.
    And by the way - soldering without a solder mask was quite a challenge, probably? ;)
  • #3
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    phanick wrote:
    The only problematic place (which even Eagle warned about) was below - I had to cut the slight indigestion of the pad tracks with a knife. Well, here are two tracks of 0.01 mils between 1.5 mm pads (bigger than standard Eagle pads from scalers), which is 0.006mils of clearance.

    Probably 10 mils track and 6 mils spacing
  • #4
    Tommy82
    Level 40  
    How does such a console react to the plugged in both cartridges?

    This is how this console should be made from scratch. In our neighborhood, if someone had an original NES, he lost his life ;) through the cartridge.
  • #5
    phanick
    Level 28  
    Tommy82 wrote:
    How does such a console react to the plugged in both cartridges?

    This is how this console should be made from scratch. In our neighborhood, if someone had an original NES, he lost his life ;) through the cartridge.

    Identical to the original, all lines of both slots are connected in parallel, i.e. inserting more than one cartridge will cause the chips in both to want to expose data at the same time, causing a conflict on the bus, which the processor will read as random data - neither game It will not work.

    You could be tempted with the solution that some of the cartridge detection consoles use when switching between the external cartridge slot and the built-in compilation:
    * taking advantage of the fact that there are two ground pins in the 60 pin socket (and two power pins) and disconnecting one of these two ground pins (or power) from its normal function, pulling it with a resistor to power (or ground) - and using it as a switch . When the status on this pin is high (or low), there is no cartridge in the 60 pin socket, and when it is low (or high) it is, because in 99% of cartridges both ground and power pins are shorted together

    The downside of this solution is that then all the current will return (or flow) to the cartridge with only one pin, causing its faster wear
    Code:

                                  +5V
                                   |
    Kartridż     Gniazdo 60 pin    R
          +->    ]-----------------+--- DETEKCJA (+5V przy braku kartridża, 0V gdy kartridż wsadzony)
    GND --+->    ]-- GND

          +->    ]-- +5V
    +5V --+->    ]-- +5V

             lub

    Kartridż     Gniazdo 60 pin   
          +->    ]-- GND
    GND --+->    ]-- GND

          +->    ]-----------------+---- DETEKCJA (0V przy braku kartridża, +5V gdy kartridż wsadzony)
    +5V --+->    ]-- +5V           R
                                   |
                                  GND



    * taking advantage of the fact that on 99% of cartridges the following two pairs of pins are zware with each other: SOUND_IN and SOUND_OUT and CIRAM_ / CE and PPU_ / A13. You can disconnect a pair of pins in the socket from their original function, connect one to the ground (or power) and pull the other with a resistor to the power (or ground). Then the detection is done in the same way as above.
    The downside is that, however, 1% of cartridges use these functions and then either we lose the ability to introduce additional sound channels through the cartridge (in the case of 1 pair) or additional advanced graphic effects (in the case of a second pair)

    * the use of an external additional switch in which the user would choose which socket to be active

    Added after 37 [seconds]:

    szymon122 wrote:
    phanick wrote:
    The only problematic place (which even Eagle warned about) was below - I had to cut the slight indigestion of the pad tracks with a knife. Well, here are two tracks of 0.01 mils between 1.5 mm pads (bigger than standard Eagle pads from scalers), which is 0.006mils of clearance.

    Probably 10 mils track and 6 mils spacing

    Yes, 10 mils and 6 mils (or 0.01 inch and 0.006 inch)

    Added after 1 [minutes]:

    398216 Usunięty wrote:
    "The new life of the console case ..." should be.
    Anyway, you did a pretty good job. Practically from scratch and harder because you had to adjust to the existing housing. I do not know if I would like to, because consoles have never been my hobby, and I do not like playing too much. But - whoever prefers what. In any case, I appreciate the input and the end result.
    And by the way - soldering without a solder mask was quite a challenge, probably? ;)

    No why? Soldering without a soldermask requires only a little longer pre-heating in order for the supplied tin to cover the entire copper pad.
  • #6
    Bogdan 6
    Level 15  
    And what soldering iron does my friend phanick use. Because February looks very nice without contamination, you can see the PCB was not washed after soldering because there are minimal amounts of flux around the soldered elements.
    I am still combining various methods of solder mask, etc., and so I return to painting with rosin, drying soldering and washing it, and re-painting and drying on an iron at 60 degrees Celsius. for about 1 hour. I used to tin, but the visual effects and sometimes overheated (chafing) paths, I even tinned with Lichtenberg's alloy or something like that, but the tin turned black after time, even during soldering there was a different smell like citric acid so stale.
  • #7
    398216 Usunięty
    Level 43  
    phanick wrote:
    No why?
    Rather, I meant not just the fact that the experience: "... 10 mils track and 6 mils spacing ...". Soldering the pads (without a solder mask) between which the track is additionally led in such a way as not to spill the tin and it is already quite difficult, and when there are two tracks? All that's left for me to do is to congratulate you on mastering the art of soldering to perfection.
    Anyway, bows are also due to the quality of the tiles themselves.