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Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter

CMS 9993 42
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • In today's article I will test for you a Chinese, 9V reusable battery, charged via USB.
    I have described it once tricked charger with the function of charging the 6F22 battery, the popular "nine-volt" , actually without this feature.
    Several colleagues recommended the purchase of 9V Li-Ion batteries with a built-in inverter and charger inside. Just connect to any 5V charger with a micro USB plug to charge it.
    I was tempted and ordered one piece for a trial.

    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter

    As of today, you can buy this particular model for ~ 26 Polish zlotys. Given the promised 1500 charge cycles and an hour (or one and a half, depending on the source of information) charging it looks quite interesting.

    So I decided to purchase such an invention. The versions with a capacity of 1200mAh reign on Aliexpress, but somehow I did not believe it, so following the voice of "reason" (if you can say so, when you buy a Chinese cat in a Chinese bag :) ) I chose a battery with a capacity of 800mAh, it sounded more real to me, considering the dimensions, and remember that we also have a converter and a "charger" inside.

    Now a few pics:
    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter

    The battery is very light, weighs only 24.5g, which, despite the use of a plastic housing, suggests that we will not find too much of this lithium inside.

    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter

    As we can see, the battery is equipped with a charge indicator, unfortunately it is completely useless, but more on that.
    Now it's time for some technical data, although it's hard to find anything on the web:


    - fast charging in an hour (although as I mentioned earlier, I also saw information that it is an hour and a half);
    - the charge indicator is activated by the button, but as I mentioned, it is useless, because when the voltage at the battery terminals is 7.8V, the indicator shows 3/4 of capacity;
    - rated voltage 9V;
    - declared capacity 800mAh;
    - charging with any 5VDC charger with a micro USB plug;
    - lifetime of 1500 charging cycles (I bet a maximum of five hundred);
    - charging current "Max.800mAh", I suspect it was about 800mA, which would correspond to the declared capacity and charging time of one hour;
    - dimensions: 48.5 x 26.5 x 17.5 mm;
    - weight, as I mentioned 24.5 grams, the manufacturer gives 28 grams, I do not know how much energy is stored for the missing 3.5 grams of lithium, but I suspect more than I think.

    Everything looks beautiful so far. Let's move on to checking how much truth there is in this.

    When I took the battery out of the packaging, I pressed the tester button and saw three LEDs on, four of which were possible, I did not think to measure the voltage at the battery terminals, but immediately connected it to the charger. It was lying for over an hour and a half, so if anything, it had to be fully charged. After "allegedly charging", I measured the voltage on the terminals and found that it was only 8.4V, so I connected it for 30 minutes, but the voltage did not increase any more.
    This is the first time I am dealing with this type of invention, so I decided that it may be like that and that's it.

    So we connect it, to an artificial load. Unfortunately, I do not know at what voltage the protection will work and turn off the inverter, but I know from experience that most devices work properly up to about 7.8V.
    Yes, I know that they are still good at 5V, but I omit them. Average multimeter, or, for example, my pyrometer, featured here below 7.8V, they no longer give reliable measurement results.
    For these reasons, I set the discharge voltage to just 7.8V on the artificial load.
    Here I was very disappointed:
    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter
    The artificial load used for the test was also presented on ours forum .
    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter
    After the test, it turned out that the capacity actually contains the number 8, and there are even two eights ...
    However, it is not as beautiful as it may seem, because the comma is in the wrong place.
    And so I present to you the measurement result, voltage from 8.4V to 7.8V, current 200mA. Result expressed in Ah:
    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter
    Yes, you can see the result is 0.088Ah.
    I have already started a dispute and I am counting on a refund, because while with the real capacity of, say, 400mAh, I would be reconciled, or even happy, because it is still twice as much as the "normal 6F22 battery", the difference in the form of ten times the declared value is not acceptable.

    I just hope that I just found a faulty copy and the seller will send a new one or return the money, and I will buy it again and test it. The very idea of Li-Ion cells built with the necessary converters / controllers in the 6F22 battery housing is very good, provided that it is done properly.

    Or maybe one of the readers has the same "batteries" in their resources, or maybe even uses them every day and would be able to share their opinion? Which would reassure me that I was unlucky after all, or that this was rubbish.

    Best regards.
    CMS


    EDIT 2018-06-07 17:11:

    The Chinese wrote that the battery should be charged for five hours before the first use. As for me, this is just selling a client. The battery was plugged into the charger all night (I'll give her a shot :) ). At 7:30 am it had a voltage of 8.40V. I re-measured when I got with her to the company, it was 9:28, which is two hours after unplugging from the charger. I was a bit surprised, because it only had 8.37V, to be sure I checked it with two multimeters, the result was identical.
    This time the capacity measurement looked different. The current was still set to 200mA, because in the case of capacitance measurement, it is impossible to set less in this load.
    I set the lower threshold to 5.80V, i.e. 2.9V has a cell. I wasn't watching the readings all the time, but the last voltage I saw was 6.21V, when I looked the next time the battery was 0.0V (i.e. the protection was working) and the capacity meter showed 449mAh.
    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter
    Nevertheless, after pressing the "test" button, one LED was on on the indicator.

    In the meantime, I started looking for some information about these batteries and found somewhere in the depths of the Internet that these types of batteries should not be loaded with a current greater than 120mA. If this is the case, it looks like I have exaggerated with the load, and if so, I suspect that with a current of e.g. 100mA, the capacity may agree with the one stated on the battery label.

    All the confusion, due to the lack of data on this particular battery.

    I am glad that there was an interesting discussion, and also a bit of constructive criticism, as you can see, was useful.

    I will try to measure the capacity while charging. I know this is not the best method, but with new cells, the results should be more or less acceptable.

    Thank you for the motivation for further testing.

    In this situation, I will probably end the dispute on Aliexpress, although I will present the results of the measurements to my Chinese friend and we will see what she says. After all, nowhere there is information about the permissible "safe" current, nor about how the manufacturer measured this capacity.

    EDIT June 28, 2018 16:50:

    The dispute with the Chinese dragged on a bit. He demanded that I record a video of the test. I asked if he was serious, because the test took about two hours and fifteen minutes, so the film would be long and heavy. I also wrote that I did not intend to waste any time on it.
    The "judge" from Aliexpress entered and decided to pay the seller in full. I asked for the maximum discharge current of this battery but got no answer.

    I will add that the battery is self-discharging quite quickly. I fully charged it after finishing the last test and it was lying there unused. Yesterday it had only 8V, and I would like to remind you that it has 8.4V when fully charged.

    Best regards.
    CMS

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    About Author
    CMS
    Administrator of HydePark
    Offline 
    CMS wrote 6629 posts with rating 1653, helped 152 times. Live in city Warszawa. Been with us since 2004 year.
  • #2
    dudik56
    Level 14  
    I use such a battery in a multimeter. I load it every 2-3 months. I didn't measure the capacity, but it works well in this case.
  • #4
    piterek-23
    Level 33  
    Thanks a lot for this description / test ;)
    I wanted to do this to myself. I knew it would not be a miracle of technology, but I did not suspect it would be that bad.
  • #5
    Ficu
    Level 31  
    I don't know where you got the information that there is a different inverter inside than the one that is used for charging. In the center there are 2 lipo / liion cells which are led through the BMS to the discharge connector. As you know, lipo usually works in the range of 3-4.2V, so discharge the battery to ~ 6V or even lower, then the BMS will work and disconnect the load.
    I use such rechargeable batteries in multimeters and they work very well, the plus is there is no inverter at the output which could affect the work / readings of the multimeter.
    As it is commonly known, even rechargeable batteries sold as "9V" made of ni-mh cells will never work in the same way as an ordinary "9V" battery.
    I would also like to know on what basis you determined the lower limit of discharge to 7.8V, since ordinary 9V batteries are practically discharged to zero.

    For some time I have been just an observer of this forum and more and more often I see posts like this one, which show the ignorance of users with a fairly long experience in the forum and the number of posts, they also often mislead users / readers.

    Added after 11 [minutes]:

    I especially got up now to take measurements of my UNI-Ta multimeter and it turns out that the indication of a discharged battery appears at a voltage below 7V, and the measurements start to be incorrect only below 6.1V - I dare say that the battery shown will work perfectly in a multimeter . I suspect that from the first appearance of the low battery message, the multimeter can be used for a few more days non-stop and the measurements will still be correct. On the other hand, charging (or rather recharging the battery) from ~ 7V will take as long as going to the store for a new battery.
    I personally use the eachine rechargeable battery.
  • #6
    george2002

    Level 20  
    I have the same battery as the author of the post and I have not charged one more time and I use the Uni-T UT71A meter - it has been working great for 1.5 years, although it is true that after full charging there is no 9V only 8.4V but as I wrote on at the beginning, I have not charged the battery-accumulator yet and it works so far, maybe I use the meter too little ;) seriously, it is 3-4 times a week, but in my opinion it is a very good result anyway, because the batteries are probably already from 3 to a half and the price for one battery is a decent battery.
    PS I saw a battery like this disassembled somewhere on the internet and there is even some "electronics" :D when something starts to happen to me, I will undress ;)

    I found such a video, but it's not my newer one, because it only has 3 status-leds and mine has 4 :)

    Link



    PS2
    You can always put together such a super-capacitor :D

    [youtube]https://hackaday.com/2005/12/06/supercap-9v-battery/[/youtube]

    PS3
    However, there are two versions of this battery with 3 and 4 leds and without a converter, more info is described here
  • #8
    pier
    Level 23  
    I have such versions.
    It is strange because it is more expensive and has twice the declared capacity.
    I haven't had the opportunity to check its capacity yet, but I will probably do it out of curiosity.
  • #9
    szeryf3
    Level 21  
    @CMS I will wait for the resolution of your dispute with the seller and for a new test of a new battery.
  • #10
    CMS
    Administrator of HydePark
    The Chinese wrote back ... Currently, another test is underway on slightly different terms. When finished, I will add the results to the first post.
  • #11
    george2002

    Level 20  
    Gentlemen, everything is clear, the capacity indicated on the battery is its capacity of 4.2V and at 9V the capacity will be known to be at least two times smaller, the whole capacity puzzle :) but anyway I am very happy with this battery, I will never buy normal batteries again, and if it dies, it is more profitable to have the battery from inside replace nothing with the usual buy :D
  • #12
    krisRaba
    Level 30  
    george2002 wrote:
    Gentlemen, everything is clear, the capacity indicated on the battery is its capacity of 4.2V and at 9V the capacity will be known to be at least two times smaller, the whole capacity puzzle :)

    It rather has 2 cells in series and no boost converter at the output, hence the voltage at the output is max. 2x4.2 = 8.4V and it drops as it discharges. If you had an inverter there, it would hold the voltage rigidly until reaching the UVLO at the input, after which the output would cut off.
    Boosta probably has a USB to charge the cells ...
  • #13
    CMS
    Administrator of HydePark
    krisRaba wrote:
    It rather has 2 cells in series and no boost converter at the output, hence the voltage at the output is max. 2x4.2 = 8.4V


    You're right.
    Interesting fact, I came across an auction today with the same battery, which had a voltage range of 8.2V-9V.
  • #14
    Jawi_P
    Level 35  
    CMS wrote:
    And so I present to you the measurement result, voltage from 8.4V to 7.8V, current 200mA.

    Not too high load current of this battery?
  • #15
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #16
    george2002

    Level 20  
    krisRaba wrote:
    george2002 wrote:
    Gentlemen, everything is clear, the capacity indicated on the battery is its capacity of 4.2V and at 9V the capacity will be known to be at least two times smaller, the whole capacity puzzle :)

    It rather has 2 cells in series and no boost converter at the output, hence the voltage at the output is max. 2x4.2 = 8.4V and it drops as it discharges. If you had an inverter there, it would hold the voltage rigidly until reaching the UVLO at the input, after which the output would cut off.
    Boosta probably has a USB to charge the cells ...


    That's right, I have not written this anymore because from the tossed videos it can be seen and heard, and I was referring to the capacity only because of the discrepancies in this topic :) and the boost does not need to be charged from USB because it can charge each battery separately to 4.2V and then they are connected, which gives 8.4V at the output after full charge, here I am writing about a version without a step-UP converter because the version with a converter has one battery and the voltage of 4.2V is increased to 9V, but as in the video, the reviewer informs that the disadvantages are that the voltage is constantly on until the inverter suddenly turns off due to low voltage on the battery and it is worth not to use it where there must be information about low voltage because it it simply dies suddenly without warning, so, for example, for carbon monoxide detectors, etc., then it is worth using a normal battery and one with a converter, e.g. for a meter, but the meter suddenly dies, not to mention the disturbances generated in the version with a converter, I am also glad that I have a 2x4 version. 2V rechargeable batteries :D
  • #17
    CMS
    Administrator of HydePark
    I added the results of the new measurements to the first post. Feel free to read and comment.
  • #18
    Jawi_P
    Level 35  
    odalladoalla wrote:
    I was just about to ask what standard the Moderator cites for his research ... well, the results came out because the measurement methodology is what it is. I recommend tutoring (not consultation) with another Mr. Moderator Marek Skalski.
    Especially that most hand-held multimeters use a current of several milliamps even with a BARGRAPH ON FULL. And for that this rechargeable battery is suitable. I would not power the starter of the tank.

    But this malice is not needed.
    Besides, how much current is any bargraph drawing? :) Unless on LEDs :)
  • #19
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #20
    krisRaba
    Level 30  
    CMS wrote:
    After all, nowhere there is information about the permissible "safe" current, nor about how the manufacturer measured this capacity.

    You can also assume that it is a replacement for a 9V battery, and this one has a rather low current efficiency. If we have a device powered by such a battery, the battery will also work in "heavenly" conditions, with low currents.

    For example, this one has a max. continuous discharge 150mA
    https://www.tme.eu/pl/Document/44e2b5a5a277fb97063ce3897cb3bea2/BAT-6F22-UL.pdf

    here, for example, a decrease in capacity as the discharge current is increased
    https://www.tme.eu/pl/Document/85e2ba70ef5b79d1bf3523f67041472d/BAT-6LR61_EGU.pdf

    Although it has 1000mA continuous ;)
    https://www.tme.eu/pl/Document/4278542a2e7fe00e73156cbf8a083b58/BAT-6F22_EG.pdf
  • #21
    CMS
    Administrator of HydePark
    odalladoalla wrote:
    and direct a person with a low level of knowledge in a given field towards a COMPETENT person in order to make up for the momentary ignorance.


    I've already noticed that our new moderator specializes in this field.
    I also do not perceive your previous post as malice. On the contrary, you did the right thing by referring me straight to a specialist in this field. Nobody is omniscient, and I just write articles. I do not have to be a specialist for each of the described devices. My professional industry is, service of multimedia projectors and cosmetic and podiatry milling machines. And, after work, I write articles FOR YOU so that you can sit down with a cup of coffee after work and read. :) .

    Constructive criticism is always welcome by me.

    Best regards.
    CMS
  • #22
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #23
    Kajox
    Level 16  
    Overall, this battery has a maximum current of about 100mA. Above, a protection is activated or the converter simply does not produce and the voltage drops drastically. All in all, what could you want from such a small coil. My colleague did not look at the description of the auction or there was no such information. At the auction where I ordered
    there was a photo from an artificial load and just a mention of a current of 100mA.

    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter

    I am enclosing the result of my measurement, it does not satisfy me, therefore I established a dispute "majfrendom". A bit of poor quality, the camera lens just broke and filings poured on me and the lens did not sharpen. You can see something, but if someone had a problem with reading, about 260mAh came out and the voltage dropped drastically.

    Battery 6F22 OKcell JRGK 800mAh 9V USB in Li-Ion version with built-in converter
  • #24
    meloch
    Level 29  
    odalladoalla wrote:

    I was just about to ask what standard the Moderator cites for his research ... well, the results came out because the measurement methodology is what it is. I recommend tutoring (not consultation) with another Mr. Moderator Marek Skalski.
    Especially that most hand-held multimeters use a current of several milliamps even with a BARGRAPH ON FULL. And for that this rechargeable battery is suitable. I would not power the starter of the tank.


    edited because I created a new unit of current-
    miAmper - a special non-SI unit.


    What is the specific standard in this respect? I would love to read it - others probably too.

    For miAmper, I propose the Nobel Prize without further ado.
  • #25
    User removed account
    Level 1  
  • #26
    Kamikazepl
    Level 14  
    And I am interested in what is the case with measurements with such a "battery".
    What does the output voltage look like? As you know, the voltage from an ordinary battery or battery can be considered stable. And what is the case with an inverter, which, however, can bring its own to a meter.
    Rather, the meters are made for batteries, and not for the power supply from the converter (with exceptions). Will it not be misleading?
  • #27
    meloch
    Level 29  
    odalladoalla wrote:

    Speaking of familiarization,
    I don't know, maybe this or that ... I'll be happy to read it too, but not for this or that price
    https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/32662
    alternatively you can politely ask the folks at the BTO in the lab. maybe they will provide you with an excerpt from this standard, although I doubt because there is such a "footnote" in it that for not paid distribution they will pursue - intellectual values, copyrights or such other crap. In general, look for a Standardization Information Point - do not count that you will get information there for free, not to mention the standards. Such times, money, bear, money.


    Spelling: for the price, but also - unpaid distribution, not "unpaid".

    Fact: Standards cannot be copied, only purchased.
    Another thing is, how do China's "cool products" fit in with the standards? According to hardly any product meets the standards. China mainly goes for quantity, not quality. A simple example of abuse of the CE mark, which has a slightly different shape from that given in the standards. There is no certainty that the standard (which you mentioned above) can be applied to the battery in the subject.
  • #28
    Jawi_P
    Level 35  
    People, what standards are you writing about here?
    Standards determining the load level of a cell / battery? :)
    The manufacturer's declaration is such a "standard".
    Stop these inventions because you are doing some flyme.
  • #29
    Janusz_kk
    Level 29  
    Kamikazepl wrote:
    What does the output voltage look like? As you know, the voltage from an ordinary battery or battery can be considered stable. And what is the case with an inverter, which, however, can bring its own to a meter.
    Rather, the meters are made for batteries, and not for the power supply from the converter (with exceptions). Will it not be misleading?


    After all, you have stated in the thread that these are two batteries connected in series. The converter is only for USB charging.
  • #30
    Kajox
    Level 16  
    I just forgot to mention it. These are probably different versions. For me, there is one lipo link. Voltage above 9v until discharged.