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Pigeon: Open Cloud Camera on Raspberry Pi Zero

ghost666 13644 17
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • Pigeon: Open Cloud Camera on Raspberry Pi Zero
    Pigeon is a simple webcam, dedicated to work in the cloud. It is based on the Raspberry Pi Zero W, costing just $ 10. The minicomputer, together with the camera, are enclosed in a housing made in 3D printing technology. A simple handle is integrated with the housing, which allows it to be mounted anywhere, e.g. on the wall.

    The software itself, listed below, should also work with, for example, a normal Raspberry Pi, although the 3D housing was designed for the Zero W model.

    The aim of the project is to create a simple and inexpensive webcam with great possibilities and many functions that would work in the cloud.

    Main functions

    * Motion detection.
    * Dropbox integration (for storing MP4 files recorded upon motion detection).
    * Simple installer.
    * Live video streaming to any web browser.
    * Authentication when watching a video stream.
    * Housing made in 3D printing technology.
    * Possibility of interfacing with IFTTT (If this then that - a cloud-based system that allows you to control the behavior of the systems, managed via the web interface) - it allows, for example, to generate notifications: SMS, e-mail, slack messages, etc. when the camera detects motion, saves something in Dropbox etc.
    * Automatic deletion of local files after uploading them to Dropbox.
    * Integrated, modular design, making it easy to add new modules.

    Needed items

    * Printed cover - downloadable here .
    * Raspberry Pi Zero W with the latest Raspbian (regular Zero, without WiFi module also works, but requires an additional wireless USB network card).
    * Internet connection.
    * Raspberry Pi Camera.
    * 5V power supply with microUSB.

    Installing the software

    Let's connect to our Raspberry Pi Zero computer via SSH or connect the monitor and keyboard to it. We have to make sure that the camera connected to RPi is properly installed and working. To do this, enter in the command line:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    If the camera does not work properly, we must make sure that it is enabled in the system (option number five in raspi-config):

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    In case of problems, help can be found, among others here .

    Then we need to clone the repository, preferably using git, to our computer. In the console, enter:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    After downloading the files, we need to give the script execution rights and run it:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    Installing the software takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes. During this process, we will have to provide a number of data, including configuration of our Dropbox, etc.

    Camera activation

    After the installation is complete, just go to the website to watch the live video:

    Code:
    http://[IP-NASZEJ-RPI]:[8099]


    8099 is the default port for which the camera is configured. If we want to watch the video outside our local network, remember to configure port forwarding in our router.

    If we want the camera application to start every time the system starts, we have to edit the rc.local file:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    We add the following line in it:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    ensuring however that the exit 0 line is at the end of the file. We add our entry right under the comment. After editing, save the file and exit the editor.

    Finally, it is worth making sure that the right time zone in our RPi is set so that the files sent by the camera have the correct date and time. Just type in the command line:

    Code: bash
    Log in, to see the code


    And choose options: Internationalization Options, where we can find the time zone settings.

    The current stage of project development

    The project is currently in the initial stage of development. In pigeon.conf, you can change the default settings to suit your needs. Future ideas for device development include:

    Software:

    * Creation of a web interface for system management
    * Remote access to the camera without port forwarding
    * IOS app with push notifications

    Hardware:

    * LED lights on when motion is detected
    * Servo to rotate the camera.

    The first attempts to detect traffic are very promising. In the photo below we see an image with the detected moving object - a squirrel selected:

    Pigeon: Open Cloud Camera on Raspberry Pi Zero


    Sources:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2230707
    https://github.com/geraldoramos/pigeon

    Cool! Ranking DIY
    Can you write similar article? Send message to me and you will get SD card 64GB.
    About Author
    ghost666
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    ghost666 wrote 10259 posts with rating 8532, helped 157 times. Live in city Warszawa. Been with us since 2003 year.
  • #2
    Tommy82
    Level 40  
    Only it does exactly the same as my tomato router, with a camera connected to the usb (the first hit in the drawer surprised) and installed motion + a little individualization.
    And I have the router turned on anyway.
  • #4
    george2002

    Level 20  
    One thing but - here the quality is probably a bit different than cheap webcams :) because the more expensive ones will be more expensive than RPI, I'm thinking about making an HDMI microscope with RPi Zero :)
  • #5
    rosak
    Car dashboards specialist
    george2002 wrote:
    here probably a little different quality than cheap webcams


    That's it. The $ 5 Pi camera is much better than the $ 30 USB camera and maybe even more.

    george2002 wrote:
    I am thinking of making myself an HDMI microscope with RPi Zero


    Great thing, I already did.
  • #6
    george2002

    Level 20  
    rosak wrote:
    Great thing, I already did.

    You can have some info or photos on how it turned out :) ?
  • #9
    rosak
    Car dashboards specialist
    A regular camera for about $ 5, the lens I bought for about $ 8, I sawed the plate a bit under the lens mount that I had at hand, but you can buy 5 for $ 3.
  • #10
    george2002

    Level 20  
    rosak wrote:
    A regular camera for about $ 5, the lens I bought for about $ 8, I sawed the plate a bit under the lens mount that I had at hand, but you can buy 5 for $ 3.

    Cool ! I'm taking my own, maybe I'll add some HDMI monitor with Ali, for example 7 "?
  • #12
    rosak
    Car dashboards specialist
    On eBay from China. I paid exactly GBP 4.58.
  • #13
    servgsm
    Level 23  
    Hello,

    Of course, I pay tribute to the execution and knowledge gained during the project, but I am bothered by the costs and, in my opinion, it is engaging the tank to kill the tulip.
    Our homes now have a lot of equipment, the capabilities of which we sometimes have no idea.
    After all, our modem-router-switch-firewallo and so on is a kind of computer adapted to specific activities, but after uploading the software, for example, DD-WRT or Gargoyle, we gain access to many new functions, not necessarily associated with device. The software base is usually Linux, so why not use such an existing device instead of playing with additional costs?

    The processors in these devices are usually "bored", so you can take advantage of their potential! Obviously, I doubt it will achieve a 720p image, but 480p seems very likely. For example, the Gargoyle software has a built-in function to support a USB camera and, I must admit, it is very good and smooth.

    Greetings,
    Bartek.
  • #14
    george2002

    Level 20  
    servgsm wrote:
    Hello,

    Of course, I pay tribute to the execution and knowledge gained during the project, but I am bothered by the costs and, in my opinion, it is engaging the tank to kill the tulip.
    Our homes now have a lot of equipment, the capabilities of which we sometimes have no idea.
    After all, our modem-router-switch-firewallo and so on is a kind of computer adapted to specific activities, but after uploading the software, for example, DD-WRT or Gargoyle, we gain access to many new functions, not necessarily associated with device. The software base is usually Linux, so why not use such an existing device instead of playing with additional costs?

    The processors in these devices are usually "bored", so you can take advantage of their potential! Obviously, I doubt it will achieve a 720p image, but 480p seems very likely. For example, the Gargoyle software has a built-in function to support a USB camera and, I must admit, it is very good and smooth.

    Greetings,
    Bartek.


    I also had fun with openwrt gargoyle usb sound card LCD internet radio for displaying frames and CPU usage and usb webcam but here, as I mentioned, it's all about quality, you can't get quality at this price and with HDMI output, not to mention that you can be tempted it is such an Rpi with a screen, for example on hdmi 7 "and such a cool little look is created with incomparable quality of the camera, because the USB costs about PLN 200-280 so that it has such parameters, and a power-hungry computer should be included :)
  • #15
    Tommy82
    Level 40  
    @ george2002
    Yes, only in some cases you do not need an hd image, but motion detection. Especially at some remote locations.

    The heart of this solution is not, contrary to appearances, Rasbery PI a motion that can be run on anything that has linux and is older than rpi itself.
    The ability to install a rpi webcam is cool in itself, but this is out of the box, this project is to make a box and install the software from the repository.
    On the other hand, if you need something more pro, there are IP cameras and IP recorders and not
    there is great money.

    It would not occur to me to put a description of installing the camera on a router in the DIY section, which involves installing a few packages and adding a few scripts.
    But it is enough to do the same on RPI, it becomes DIY.
  • #16
    george2002

    Level 20  
    Tommy82 wrote:
    @ george2002
    Yes, only in some cases you do not need an hd image, but motion detection. Especially at some remote locations.

    The heart of this solution is not, contrary to appearances, Rasbery PI a motion that can be run on anything that has linux and is older than rpi itself.
    The ability to install a rpi webcam is cool in itself, but this is out of the box, this project is to make a box and install the software from the repository.
    On the other hand, if you need something more pro, there are IP cameras and IP recorders and not
    there is great money.

    It would not occur to me to put a description of installing the camera on a router in the DIY section, which involves installing a few packages and adding a few scripts.
    But it is enough to do the same on RPI, it becomes DIY.



    Everything agrees with the fact that I am interested in making this Pi a nice compact camera for mounting SMD to the monitor, not monitoring ;)
  • #17
    rosak
    Car dashboards specialist
    george2002 wrote:
    Everything agrees with the fact that I am interested in making this Pi a nice compact camera for mounting SMD to the monitor, not monitoring


    But all the time you write in the thread "Pigeon: open camera for working in the cloud on Raspberry Pi Zero" ;)
  • #18
    george2002

    Level 20  
    rosak wrote:
    george2002 wrote:
    Everything agrees with the fact that I am interested in making this Pi a nice compact camera for mounting SMD to the monitor, not monitoring


    But all the time you write in the thread "Pigeon: open camera for working in the cloud on Raspberry Pi Zero" ;)


    Okay, but you can do the same as in the thread about RPi with the camera as a microscope ??