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[Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

ludek111 31482 64
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • #31
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    Fragments of the diagrams are from the SPS5470, I had about 4 in my hands, one of which was for me. I got rid of about 60% of the elements in it and it still works :) It's just a pity that I didn't have a decent camera then. There are two nice FST19330 diodes at the output of this power supply, only hard to solder them :D

    The voltage protection of such power supplies is usually implemented on comparators (LM339, LM393) and the actuation threshold of such a comparator is changed with literally one resistor.
  • #32
    gosztekseba
    Level 31  
    ukixx wrote:
    I temporarily turned this device to 18V but it has 16V capacitors, so I quickly turned it to 14.8V, but it is not possible to measure the current. Maybe one day a restriction will be made. [/url] [/ img]


    The current limitation can be done even on a separate PCB without delving into the power supply diagram. An additional, simple circuit on an operational amplifier, transistor, or a stubborn, simple Attiny13 processor, based on the voltage drop on the shunt. For less experienced people it will probably be a safer solution than "picking" in the power supply. You can even be tempted to smoothly adjust the switch-off current depending on the given need. best regards
  • #33
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    Yes, limit it to 40A on a separate PCB, taking into account in the worst case 12V voltage drop on it, it will be 480W loss. Unless to add an additional buck converter, which will be half the size of the power supply.

    This DELL that I have takes out 750W from two tiny transformers on PQI26 / 11.5 cores, until I'm afraid to touch the primary side, because even the meter probe on the controller side (device resistance 10M? ;) connected to the output voltage divider causes variation of the power supply. I quickly upgraded the circuit with a shunt and an operational amplifier, but I will have to use shielded cables to connect it to the controller (UC28025), the frequency of the converter is 250kHz.
  • #34
    gosztekseba
    Level 31  
    ukixx wrote:
    Yes, limit it to 40A on a separate PCB, taking into account in the worst case 12V voltage drop on it, it will be 480W loss. Unless to add an additional buck converter, which will be half the size of the power supply.


    12V drop on what? On the shunt? For 40A, then a piece of copper wire is used ...
  • #35
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    gosztekseba wrote:
    ... transistor, ...

    The shunt is not a current regulator as if you didn't know. From the shunt you have information about the current and you probably need to deliver it somewhere, since not to the controller in the power supply, then where :?:
  • #36
    gosztekseba
    Level 31  
    ukixx wrote:

    The shunt is not a current regulator as if you didn't know. From the shunt you have information about the current and you probably need to deliver it somewhere, since not to the controller in the power supply, then where :?:


    Based on the voltage drop reading on the shunt, the relay / transistor (e.g. IRFZ44) will disconnect the load from the power supply - I wrote an additional circuit that controls the current and disconnects the load after exceeding a given value. A driver based on an operational amplifier, processor or even transistors. Please do not imply the lack of such basic knowledge here ... My friend probably mistook the PWM control as a current regulator .. For people who are not very experienced, it is a bit risky to fumble in the power supply controller. Even if the power supply is built on the basis of the old good bone 494, it's not a problem ... Worse, for example, with the ST72264G2 and it's better to leave it alone if you don't know what you're doing and change the dividers on each operational amplifier you come across ...
  • #37
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    Set this limit, for example, to 3A and see what will happen after connecting to the output, for example, a H4 60W bulb. Such an arrangement will create a rectangular (PWM) voltage and current output with an amplitude much higher than these 3A. For a light bulb it does not matter too much, at most it will start flashing, but for an electronic device it may end badly. Add a choke and a diode to this and you will get a buck converter where the output current and voltage will be smoothed.

    What you write about is not a limitation because nothing limits you (the output current is 0 or the maximum that the receiver is able to download at a given voltage). It is nothing more than a relay replaced with a transistor that acts as a reusable fuse.
  • #38
    gosztekseba
    Level 31  
    Why should the PWM waveform be created? The controller, after detecting too high current, will disconnect the load or possibly after switching the power supply on through the transistor, it will stop shorting the green wire with ground in the case of ATX and will not restart until the power supply is turned off. I do not understand why the PWM waveform should be created when the power supply is loaded with a current of 3A. With a load as low as 3A, the power supply is not so "silly", I understand at 40A where the power supply reaches the limit of its efficiency.
  • #39
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    --------------------------------
    It is not going for anything. Regulating with such currents is difficult. The easiest way to modify the resistors setting the maximum output current on a given line in the power supply. If we do not want to rummage, we can make a separate board that will act as a digital fuse in the event of overcurrent and disconnect our protected circuit until the reset button is pressed, or whatever "in this pattern". This is the most sensible solution when we talk about such currents. A well-designed system has a chance to work even at full current. I think that the margin given by the power supply (12.15V) may be quite sufficient. {I am talking about this extra 150mV as the voltage lost by a well-designed fuse at the maximum output current of the 12V line}

    Yes, the use of low voltage MOSFETs with a very low RDSon and a suitable control circuit will be very appropriate as well as a good PCB layout on a sufficiently thick laminate and so on.
  • #40
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    gosztekseba wrote:
    Why should the PWM waveform be created?

    You started writing about current limitation, and now it comes out that you are writing about an electronic fuse without self-closing. The output parameters of the power supply are current and voltage, the fuse only limits the time, not the current. In the event of limitation, the system would turn on again after the current drops below the set limit, i.e. once zero and once full, which is PWM.

    gosztekseba wrote:
    I do not understand why the PWM waveform should be created when the power supply is loaded with a current of 3A.

    Read the first 7 words from my previous post, this is explained why with a load of 3A.

    ludek111 wrote:
    Regulating with such currents is difficult. The easiest way to modify the resistors setting the maximum output current on a given line in the power supply.

    Exactly, the controller takes care of regulation, has a set point, and keeps an eye on it. Also, it is enough to ask him a different value and he does all the work for us. But when it comes to current, only if it has a current transformer or a shunt. Out of about 50 ATX power supplies that I dismantled, only 2 had a transformer and none had a shunt.

    ludek111 wrote:
    If we do not want to rummage, we can make a separate board that will act as a digital fuse in the event of overcurrent and disconnect our protected circuit until the reset button is pressed, or whatever "in this pattern".

    This only makes sense if the protection is set to a lower current than the power supply capacity.
  • #41
    gosztekseba
    Level 31  
    ukixx wrote:

    You started writing about current limitation, and now it comes out that you are writing about an electronic fuse without self-closing


    True, I put myself wrong - I meant the electronic fuse from the beginning. I did not mean current regulation, but the adjustable threshold for switching on the overload protection. That is why I was surprised by the statement about the additional converter. best regards
  • #42
    Tommy82
    Level 41  
    One comment, colleagues.
    One thing would have to be careful with these power supplies. If the power supply comes from a 1U server, it is often the fan in the middle that is responsible for its cooling, but also one, two fans mounted in the chassis. Some power supplies will be "passive" at all, because the power supply is built in such a way that it is an "exhaust pipe" for parts of the cooling system, most often disks. What am I going to. The point is that sometimes "box" cooling may not be enough for the entire power supply, because the designer also took into account something else. In addition, the windmills in 1 u servers are small monsters which, as indicated above, do for a jet, I used to make a mini vacuum cleaner on one of them, but it was not even a windmill, but a "two-stage turbine" ;) . And these "passive" power supplies from 1u servers require a lot of airflow at high power.
    To sum up, I would look for power supplies from larger and older servers for such games, because in the basic configuration, older servers were more power-hungry. But this, of course, is not the rule.
    In addition, there is a bit more space inside, such a Dell power supply is stuffed inside, I don't know.
    Well, having two such power supplies and a bay where they park, you could be tempted to play with redundancy. In total, in delu dl360 g4 and above, the fans are controlled by this bay but I do not know how it is made.
  • #43
    tos18
    Level 39  
    Will anyone help with the pinout of the Delta DPS-1050AB power supply from the IBM Xseries 455?
  • #44
    motobasia
    Level 10  
    Has anyone managed to raise the voltage to 13.8V in the DPS-600QB?
  • #45
    bogi
    Level 29  
    Tommy82 wrote:

    Well, having two such power supplies and a bay where they park, you could be tempted to play with redundancy. In total, in delu dl360 g4 and above, the fans are controlled by this bay but I do not know how it is made.

    I can provide such a set if needed. The SP5IT column has shown how to raise the cut-off voltage threshold in the DPS600PB power supply.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server
  • #46
    motobasia
    Level 10  
    bogi wrote:
    The SP5IT column has shown how to raise the cut-off voltage threshold in the DPS600PB power supply.
    The DPS-600QB and DPS600PB are two different power supplies.
  • #47
    pawelj
    Level 15  
    Hello.
    Has anyone managed to silence the windmills in this power supply?
    I only have a jet plane and I can not dig to any description.
    I mean DELTA DPS-600QB.
  • #48
    bogi
    Level 29  
    Make a generator for 555 and pass the signal from it in place of the red fan cable disconnected from the power supply. Select the frequency so that the power supply does not turn off (best to measure before switching). Then you can freely reduce the revs to make it quieter.
  • #49
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Hello
    Does my colleague @ukixx have a pinology / description for this power supply, i.e. SPS5470, because I came across this thread in the search engine, and I did not find anything before.

    best regards
  • #50
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    Unfortunately, I do not have any description. The power supply starts after 230V is applied to the AC bus and the output voltage immediately appears 12V and 56V.
  • #51
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Thanks for the quick reply, but mine doesn't start, probably broken if it does start right away.
    best regards
  • #52
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    This power supply has two separate supply paths switched by four relays, two for one path, and in order to start it, you must either short the appropriate two relays or supply voltage to the AC bus. The power supply is rather hard to damage, it gives a current of 180A at the output, although it can be faulty. Inside there are 3 independent converters, an active PFC and a microprocessor monitoring system. It would be nice if you got a few more copies, the more that there are a lot of nice parts inside, but the thick 5-layer laminate effectively makes desoldering difficult.
  • #53
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Hello
    The friend from whom I got it has one more piece. These are plays allegedly after the liquidation of bases in Germany. I found out that there is still a dozen of them (in Germany). Therefore, I wanted to ask if we are talking about the same, because these are made in the USA, and there are also Chinese.
  • #54
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    The ones I had were "Made in China" but that shouldn't really matter. Inside, IR, IXYS, Farchild, Panasonic, etc. are all USA, EU, Japan and Germany, and China is probably only on PCB, chokes and housing.
  • #55
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Ok, you wrote earlier that 60% of the parts can be removed and it still works. Can you say more about it? There are 4 CDs in mine, it opens like a "book"
  • #56
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    I just left only the mains filter circuit with fuses, APFC, Stand-by inverter and main inverter. I removed the UPS converter with controller, inverter and diodes, 56V charger with controller, even FST19330 diodes, microcontroller with optocouplers. Just what could still work.

    Probably the most difficult thing was to pull out the UPS transformer and the FST19330 diodes. Skoda that I did not have anything to take photos after the modification, although it is possible that somewhere there would be some bad ones made with the phone.

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server
  • #57
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Thanks for the answer, I can see that it is really a monster, not only it has 175A at 12V, it also has 57V and 10A on this bus and also has a UPS / charger? I admit I did not imagine something like that in my collection, but maybe I will get it somehow ;-) I would like to use it as a 12V power supply, but I'm also interested in the 57V ones, e.g. for anodizing aluminum. But for now, only the 12V ones satisfy me.
    Only tomorrow I will be able to look inside, meanwhile I am sending photos of mine to be sure about the output socket. [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    But I gave the bodies, this one of mine is Chinese, and the one from my friend is the USA.
    Sorry for the mistake.
  • #58
    Vinncent
    Level 12  
    Hello, I brought this 2nd power supply from a friend of the USA version, he gives photos: [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    I wanted to run the 12V board first and throw out unnecessary components / plates.
    I have a question because I do not know how it is configured yet, as much as I opened it, whether it is possible to detach individual discs in full, it is known that it is not like that.
    I'm scared of the control (too many pins), you said that you can break a lot and the power supply starts right away, I'm a bit afraid of it and hence these questions. Maybe some tips.
    best regards

    PS
    Something these photos are hard to read, like what it will send again.
  • #59
    jazzguy1984
    Level 1  
    Hi Ludek,

    Thanks for your information. I have managed to get my DPS600QB working, however I'm not getting the full 40A. How do I do this? Thanks
  • #60
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    Vinncent wrote:
    I'm scared of the control (too many pins), you said that you can break a lot and the power supply starts right away, I'm a bit afraid of it and hence these questions. Maybe some tips.

    What control? The power supply starts immediately after applying voltage to the AC rails (those thin in the middle of the power supply), and there is 12V on the thick pins on the back. I think I need to find some time and take some photos, although the power supply has ATX protection and can turn off in case of overload. But it is enough to reset the "latch" on one of the LM339 comparators and the power supply works again.