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[Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

ludek111 30891 64
This content has been translated » The original version can be found here
  • [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server
    I decided to write here on the forum about my exploits. Maybe someone would need such power. Note: I do not take responsibility if something happens to you, the reader, while playing with used power adapters that I am writing about here. A week ago I found a 600W power supply from a good Delta company on Allegro: DPS-600QB for only PLN 49. I bought 2 pieces right away. The power supply at the output allows to "pull" up to 40A from the 12V line and up to 28A from the 5.1V line. The strange 16-pin terminal discouraged me from buying, but I decided to get to these pins, which in a moment. After short tests, it turned out that the 12V and 5.1V lines give the output 11.9V and 5.10V respectively. The power supply is for real very loud , I do not advise spending several hours in its vicinity.

    I dismantled the whole thing and started to investigate what the pins from the 4x4 pin are for. Without going into details, I have determined that the pinout looks like this:
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server pinout.png Download (2.77 kB)
    From the left, as in the picture below. The two copper terminals are 12V outputs, the next two are ground / GND / RTN, then we have a "mysterious" 4x4 header, the next two are ground / GND / RTN and 5.1V.

    4x4 header:
    A2, C2, D2, B3, C3, D3, C4 = GND / GROUND - are marked with the sign " * "in my drawing.
    A1 = This pin raises my doubts. It is connected to two SMD resistors with a resultant resistance of 100 Ohm. In a word: the pin is of no use to us. The so-called pull down.
    B1 = After connecting the power, this pin is high through a 10k pull up resistor connected to 5VSB inside.
    C1 = Power_ON works the same as in the ATX power supply. To turn on the power supply, connect this pin to ground. This pin is connected to a 1k resistor inside, then the signal goes to transistor sot-23 and so on.
    D1 = POWER_OK on the tested unit, the High signal appears here about 1.1 seconds after switching on with the Power_ON (c1) pin. It is probably an open collector output, watch out for this pin lest you burn the small sot23 transistor when fumbling with the meter ...
    B2 = Analog input pin. Applies to the 12V line. After applying a current of 130..180uA to this pin, it causes a change of 12V output voltage linearly. The easiest way to describe it is: 0-130uA U_out_12V = 11.90V but when we give 180uA and more, the output appears about 12.15V. In a word: voltage regulation 12V. We don't have to use this pin, but the voltage will be 11.9V (that's exactly what I have).
    A3 = Analog input pin. It applies to the 5.1V line. Same as above, but: current 10..40uA causes a change in the range of 5.10..5.23V. In a word: regulation of the 5.1V line.
    The pins below are for the I2C memory soldered to one of the standing PCBs (specifically the larger PCB).
    A4 = VSS of 24C02 chip
    B4 = SCL
    D4 = SDA
    I haven't tested thoroughly if sometimes the uC STM7x also hangs on the I2C lines. Between pins B4, D4 and A4 there are 100 Ohm resistors between the chip, just in case. Note: A4 is not connected to GND / RTN ground.

    To sum up: For proper operation of the power supply, it is enough to short PWR_ON with ground and hula. The rest are nice additions.
    Below I present a photo:
    Here is the complete power supply. Huge dimensions (LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT) [CM]: 30.5x20.9x6.9. The folded handle / handle is included in the length.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 1.jpg Download (469.77 kB)
    Yes, Delta shows the parameters.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 2.jpg Download (176.78 kB)
    Inside, after unscrewing EIGHT screws (one under the RF-shield, glued with double-sided tape). We see two beautiful Delta 12V / 2.94A turbines (i.e. cooling takes 30W at maximum speed). We can see the construction here: main PCB and two vertical boards. The larger one contains the ST72264G2 microcontroller, several LM324, LM358 op-amps, LM339 comparator (s), local 5V so-8 stabilizers, ST 2402 series I2C memory (2kB), its E0-E2 pins are connected to VSS, so from what I understand, the chip has an unlocked write (correct if I'm wrong here) and an SO-8 chip type TL384xB or TL284xB (I don't have a photo, I'm looking at the downloaded datasheet).

    Output terminals. I managed to notice that the radiator, second from the right, in the photo below heats up more than the others. Three heat sinks in the lower half of the photo below connected to GND / RTN.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 3.jpg Download (510.64 kB) [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 4.jpg Download (465.95 kB)
    Two tiles. The smaller one contains mosfet drivers and full analog op amps and comparators. You can see LM324, LM358, LM339, local regulators and drivers, e.g. MIC4426.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 5.jpg Download (492.87 kB)
    Bottom.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 6.jpg Download (523.59 kB)
    You can see a good PCB layout, where the descriptions did not fit, tables were inserted. On the right you can see 4 pieces of resistance wire connected in parallel and tracks coming directly from them in order to measure the output current. I do not want to lie, but the right side suggests that the 12 V line is implemented as a two-bar converter (because you can see 2 coils and transistors and all this in pairs, symmetrically).
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 7.jpg Download (846.61 kB)
    PCB from uC by STM. By the way, the pins protruding upwards one after the other, as in the photo from the left:
    1 16MHz sine,
    2 I do not remember
    3 ICCDATA (24th uC PIN)
    4 ICCCLK (25PIN uC)
    5 ICCSEL (26PIN uC)
    6 VSS / GND / RTN
    7 VDD (5V_SB)

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server 8.jpg Download (423.82 kB)
    Shunt resistor, the so-called "Shunt resistor" with a small value, so as not to disturb the operation of the power supply at several dozen amperes. Looking at the date-codes, the power supply is from mid-2008 (the casing also has a type code, e.g. 0842 (42nd week of 2008)).
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server IMG_84..jpg Download (223.12 kB)
    I also found circuits on the PCB UCC3895 and active PFC (power factor) controller UC3854 from Texas.

    That's enough for now. To sum up: good buy, good design, simple and reliable. But unfortunately very loud!

    English:
    BASIC way to make it work: just connect the C1 (pwr_on) with GND.

    // UPDATE1:
    NOTE: this is not a commercial action, I am writing to improve the quality of the forum, so that you can do yourself something useful if you have such a need. I anticipate the question: no, I do not sell these power supplies on Allegro, but I can see that many people have them on display, I also wish you fruitful hunting and trade negotiations :) //

    // ludek //

    Cool! Ranking DIY
    Can you write similar article? Send message to me and you will get SD card 64GB.
    About Author
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    Offline 
    ludek111 wrote 83 posts with rating 41, helped 1 times. Live in city Wroc³aw. Been with us since 2009 year.
  • #2
    ccompany
    Level 15  
    I used to work on the topic with the dell server power supply, I do not remember the model.
    In any case, there was a pin in the connector that had to be pulled up to ground so that the fans would run at a speed adequate to the temperature of the systems. Without this pin connected, the power supply worked like a small jet ..
  • #3
    deus.ex.machina
    Level 32  
    I have a lot of server power supplies - bought or recovered mainly with the thought of taking care of it someday, if not starting it, acquiring valuable components.
    I will try to describe my buoys if there is enough time.
    Plus from me - a good article because it may encourage others to follow the same path.
  • #4
    prosiak_wej
    Level 36  
    Server power supplies are enormous power, exceptional reliability and a ridiculously low price. About a year ago I bought a 550W Astec DS550-3 power supply that required a few modifications to:
    - obtain an output voltage of 13.8V (for buffer operation with AGM batteries)
    - it turned on without any problems under load

    When I find a moment, I will describe what needs to be done, what to modify. The power supply is much smaller than the Delta presented here and very popular among RC modelers ;)
  • #5
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    ccompany wrote:
    I used to work on the topic with the dell server power supply, I do not remember the model.
    Anyway, there was a pin in the connector that had to be pulled up to the ground [...] Without this pin, the power supply worked like a small jet ..


    While searching the internet for information about my power supply, I came across a few other tutorials and indeed in 4x3 pin plugs and probably 3x3 pin plugs it was possible to set the speed. It is possible that A1, B1 have this functionality, but I just didn't want to play reverse engineering anymore, because the board that the pins entered was set vertically to the PCB and had about 30 pins, and I don't have a desoldering iron. It is possible that I will do so again. I only know that the processor receives signals from the fans (the output signal is 100 Hz, I don't remember if PWM or f proportional to speed ??). As if what, the power supply slightly slows down after about 30 seconds of operation, but it does not change much ...


    @ deus.ex thanks. It is worth choosing a few of the best ones or a selection in terms of the control chip and choose the one that suits us best in terms of options / operating modes / etc.


    @prosiag_wej sure, write. Maybe someone will need such a modification, if you can still buy this model.
  • #6
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    Do you think such a power supply can be converted to get symmetrical 20-30V?
    I have a similar one from the DELL server (12V 63A) but that one is much smaller, around 10x10x25cm.
  • #7
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    ludek111 wrote:
    Connect one power supply normally, 3 via the cable to the contact, and the other without the 3rd wire (this is officially called "ground" or "ground"?) To the socket

    A friend is joking ?! I thank you for such advice ...

    I am talking more about changing the number of windings on the transformer and changing the voltage divider so that the power supply thinks it has 12V output all the time. I am more worried if something else needs to be changed, I understand that, of course, the bridge is different because different voltages, currents, but do power transistors or something like that need to be changed? In the end, the power remains the same, the voltages and currents on the high-voltage side are the same, the voltage changes only at the output.
    What do you think about it?
  • #8
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    szymon122 wrote:
    ludek111 wrote:
    Connect one power supply normally, 3 via the cable to the contact, and the other without the 3rd wire (this is officially called "ground" or "ground"?) To the socket

    A friend is joking ?! I thank you for such advice ...


    I understand that this may be it is dangerous and you can "let go of the hut with smoke", but this was the idea that occurred to me.

    As for the modification of the output voltage of the power supplies:
    As far as I know, changing the impulse transformer to such that the efficiency of the device does not decrease no is trivial.
    As for the "distortion" of negative feedback, the matter is simpler, just add a potentiometer (to the foot described as feedback) and in most cases it should give the desired effect (higher U_out). Depending on the design of the flyback power supply, in which the pulse transformer is located, I think we will encounter certain limitations related to the transformer ratio and without replacing it (which is difficult) we will encounter various restrictions (e.g. output voltage max 17V for a 12V power supply or drastic drop in efficiency after exceeding a certain maximum output voltage. I have no more ideas, if you go deeper into the topic, you would have to ask some experienced fly-back builder in my opinion.
  • #9
    prosiak_wej
    Level 36  
    Well, this is how I put together my knowledge about the DS550-3 (Dell A23300) and how much col. michael111 he will not mind, I will present here:

    1. Raising the output voltage to 13.8V.
    I will not rewrite what has already been written, so: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=22088343&postcount=1592

    (If for some reason the rcgroups topic dies, I put a copy of it in PDF and saved photos)

    2. Power supply switch-on delay and load connection.

    Fast - you could short the A1 and B6 pins directly to the ground, but when the load is connected and connected to the mains, the power supply starts reluctantly, the 'error' LED on the housing lights up. To prevent this, I inserted a circuit that delayed the connection of these pins to ground, but that was not enough. After connecting the power supply to the network, VIN_GOOD (C6) appears. From the moment of the appearance of this signal, the delay activating PS_KILL (A1) and PSON (B6) works - with the current values it is a few seconds. The load is switched on by means of a car relay with a contact load of 40A. The signal to turn it on appears on pin D6, i.e. POK - the power supply outputs a high signal there, when the output voltage will have a set value.

    A few more photos of the power supply immediately after unpacking from the package and during the first voltage modifications (I do not know why I cut the D3 pin, since the potentiometer is connected inside the power supply).

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    Edit:
    A power supply modified in this way with a delay of switching on the load works for a long time non-stop in a buffer power supply at 2x90Ah AGM SSB, the whole is powered by 12V LED lighting, network accessories (modem, router, switch, apps ...), monitoring, TV in the room and several smaller crap. I put an ordinary shop pinwheel so that it would not make noise. The power supply does not work with the nominal load, so it does not heat up too much. moreover, it is vertically oriented, convectionally, on the side of the metal distribution box. Attached with neodymium magnets :)
  • #10
    bogi
    Level 28  
    szymon122 wrote:
    Do you think such a power supply can be converted to get symmetrical 20-30V?
    I have a similar one from the DELL server (12V 63A) but that one is much smaller, around 10x10x25cm.


    You can connect two in series on each side.
  • #11
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    bogi wrote:
    You can connect two in series on each side.

    How many times should I repeat that I mean remaking one and not putting two in a row? I am only interested in whether something needs to be changed in the system, apart from deceiving the power supply that it has 12V instead of 20-30 at the output.
  • #12
    LemuRR 11
    Level 26  
    In my opinion, it is easier to make a converter, I think for audio from scratch. You would have to scroll the trafo, change the LEDs, etc. In addition, it's not the pp system. So I feel that the secondary side would be created anew.
  • #13
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    @prosiak_wej - thanks, it's okay. May someone use what you posted.
  • #14
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    LemuRR 11 wrote:
    Additionally, it's not a pp layout.

    Can you expand the abbreviation pp?
    LemuRR 11 wrote:
    So I feel that the secondary side would be created anew.

    I still don't understand why, the voltage in the socket remains the same, and so does the current. So the current through the transformer will not change. The fact that the LEDs need to be changed and rewound is obvious.
    If I designed such a converter from scratch, I would have to duplicate 90% of the diagram, so why?
  • #15
    andrzej18k
    Level 12  
    szymon122 wrote:
    Can you expand the abbreviation pp?

    It's probably about push pull.
  • #16
    LemuRR 11
    Level 26  
    szymon122 wrote:
    Can you expand the abbreviation pp?
    push-pull. This is probably a flyback power supply.
    Quote:

    I still don't understand why, the voltage in the socket remains the same, and so does the current. So the current through the transformer will not change. The fact that the LEDs need to be changed and rewound is obvious.
    If I designed such a converter from scratch, I would have to duplicate 90% of the diagram, so why?
    on the same board you will solder the diodes? You also have to wind a symmetrical Da³wik. It is easier to convert the Chinese ATX, at least the known scheme, and it is known that it is not a resonant converter. Theoretically, you can do anything, but believe me - it's a lot of fun. First you need to know 100% of the topology.
  • #17
    Qurak
    Level 17  
    Hello

    Regarding the taming of this type of power supply :)
    For some time I have had a power supply identical to the one described in this thread:
    https://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic2155589.html

    Did any of your colleagues have to deal with this "monster"? I can only run it, but I'm interested in the functions of the other pins on the multi-pin connector on the back.
    After starting, the fan accelerates to such revolutions and makes so much noise that it's hard to talk ;)
    Is it possible, for example, to regulate the fan speed or make it dependent on the temperature?

    I would love to know anyone's experiences with this device

    best regards
  • #18
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    @ Qurak - a real monster :) He will probably be able to add FAN regulation. If so, with a bit of jamming, you can insert a processor, a temperature sensor and adjust the speed of the fans depending on the temperature of the heat sink (s). It's best to unscrew it and see where the paths go, try to scribble the schematic and generally reverse engineering should lead you to some conclusions, e.g. 'this is probably a digital output' or 'it must be an analog input'. Then you look where the fan control can be and try to feed something to the analog input pins, and if they are digital, you can always try to "talk" with some simple atmega through I2C / SPI with control "what these chips are talking about" implemented with a simple state analyzer like fake sealeae for PLN 30-40 ... but it all takes time, fun and willingness :) Probably a lot of people like it, me too, so I encourage you :)

    ... or you can forcefully lower the power supply to the fans or place the power supply in an even larger housing and try to soundproof it, and so on.
  • #19
    szymon122
    Level 38  
    ludek111 wrote:
    alternatively, the supply of the valves can be forcibly lowered

    In this case, it's not that simple, I have a DELL PE2950 server myself and since it has a total of five fans, each 12V, 2-3A, about 6k RPM, when they start at full speed, we have a small jet that straightens the cables connected from the back :D
    I tried to connect them to a regulated power supply, they work stably only from about 10V but it does not work because the revolutions drop only by a few percent and you can not hear the difference. For the sound level to be acceptable, you need to lower the voltage to 8V, but it is not enough to start it to move it and at 8V it could stop at a random moment.
  • #20
    electro
    Level 18  
    szymon122 wrote:

    I tried to connect them to a regulated power supply, they work stably only from about 10V but it does not work because the revolutions drop only by a few percent and you can not hear the difference. For the sound level to be acceptable, you need to lower the voltage to 8V, but it is not enough to start it to move it and at 8V it could stop at a random moment.


    I do not know what specific fan you write about in this server, but there are four-wire ones, you regulate the speed by giving PWM on the blue wire:
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    documentation for this FAN here:
    http://partner.delta-corp.com/Products/FANUploads/Specification/PFC0612DE-F00(REV02).pdf


    Any other power supplies where the fans "go crazy" and you cannot silence them, you can cheat with a system that multiplies the RPM signals, the system controls the fans by itself, at the same time supplying the required frequency to the power supply. To this you need to add a temperature sensor, which will change the speed depending on the actual temperature.
  • #21
    TABSIOR
    Level 24  
    In the depths of the Internet, I found a pinout for the twin Delta DPS-600RB power supply. It just so happens that I bought this and the same as the author of the topic :)

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server
  • #22
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    I do not know what this "modification" is, the topic is basically how to start this power supply, it's like taking any ATX and writing that to start it, you need to shorten the green wire with the black one.
    It would be nice to make voltage regulation and current limitation in it.

    Qurak wrote:
    Hello

    Regarding the taming of this type of power supply :)
    For some time I have had a power supply identical to the one described in this thread:
    https://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/topic2155589.html

    Did any of your colleagues have to deal with this "monster"? I can only run it, but I'm interested in the functions of the other pins on the multi-pin connector on the back.
    After starting, the fan accelerates to such revolutions and makes so much noise that it's hard to talk ;)
    Is it possible, for example, to regulate the fan speed or make it dependent on the temperature?

    I would love to know anyone's experiences with this device

    best regards

    Yes, a few years ago I dealt with this monster. I made it a rectifier with a start-up. I turned the voltage up to 14.6V and I get a starting current of 176-180A, in addition, I have a potentiometer to adjust the current 5-20A. I was able to draw even a part of the diagram.

    ludek111 wrote:
    @ Qurak - a real monster :) He will probably be able to add FAN regulation. If so, with a bit of jamming, you can insert a processor, a temperature sensor and adjust the speed of the fans depending on the temperature of the heat sink (s). It's best to start it up and see where the paths go, try to scribble the schematic and in general reverse engineering should lead you to some conclusions ...

    Good luck with drawing a schematic from a 5-layer PCB :) The fan is 24V there and basically it will be able to lower its speed, if I remember correctly, it is plugged directly into the auxiliary power supply or only through some transistor. The PIC16LF877 processor sits on the bottom plate and it does not affect the operation of the power supply, so you can use it for your own needs :)
  • #23
    prosiak_wej
    Level 36  
    ukixx wrote:
    I was able to draw even a part of the diagram.


    So I encourage you to publish it, it will definitely be useful to someone :)
  • #24
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    I do not know if these scraps of the diagram will be useful to anyone, but this is the only thing I managed to draw. In fact, these are fragments from which it is impossible to assemble the power supply, but some of them can be used in a different design or attempting to modify this unit.
  • #25
    prosiak_wej
    Level 36  
    I believe that if someone needs it, even a fragment may be helpful. And it would be even better if you include a diagram or description of the voltage sweep a little higher and the current limiter.
  • #26
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    There are multi-turn potentiometers on the board and on one of them I made a voltage change, the comparators are in a latch system, so when the protection works, only a power reset or unlocking the "latch" helps, changing the protection threshold is also using a potentiometer or changing the resistor in the divider . Now I wonder if it would be possible to completely remove these LM339. I had a problem adding an attachment, something crashed and the text went first.
  • #27
    prosiak_wej
    Level 36  
    And how multiturn is great. If you reached 14.6V without any problems, it's even better. It would be good to make a set of server power supplies in terms of the possibility of modification, for example changes in the output voltage PR / resistors / small modification of the system (as in my Astec) / large modification of the system. Buffer power is a great thing, let's add LED lighting to that and that feeling when there is no electricity ;) Even despite the buffer operation and without changing the voltage, these power supplies will still be a hundred times better as a low voltage source for powering LEDs than any kind of Mean Well and other Chinese. I'm not talking about the price anymore - for 45A I gave less than PLN 50, and Chinese crap in stores from PLN 100 up for "10A".
  • #28
    ukixx
    Level 21  
    I temporarily turned this device to 18V but it has 16V capacitors, so I quickly turned it to 14.8V, but it is not possible to measure the current. Maybe one day a restriction will be made.
    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server [/ img]
  • #29
    ludek111
    Level 12  
    @ ukixx - thanks for the diagram of this power supply. I understand that this sps5470 .

    @ TABSIOR - I do not know if I looked at the photo you inserted, but the 4x4 pinout, although it actually evokes associations with the DPS-600QB, is completely different. Delta DPS-600RB not compatible with "DPS-600 QB "It is a pity that the companies did not get along in this field and did not implement a single pin standard, but then electronics / hardware hackers would have easier ... :)

    @ szymon122 and @electro - if you are interested, inside the DELTA DPS-600QB there are 3-pin "turbine" fans from Delta. I only checked that there is about 100Hz signal on the FAN1, but I must admit that I do not know if it was an input or output signal, and I do not remember whether it was PWM or only frequency modulation. The FAN2 was about 103 Hz, I don't know what the frequency discrepancy proves. The signals from the third leg of the FANs went from / to uC. As for the turbines in my power supply, I would like to add that in my opinion the airflow is a bit confusing. For air has to overcome this element of steel:

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server

    [Modification] We are taming the DELTA DPS-600QB 40A / 12V, 600W, pinout server


    // dreams: //
    I can see, gentlemen, that the topic has started. I think that you can look for some cheap server "power-ups" at a price of PLN 40-50, the seller has several hundred and develop such a universal mod ... just to hit the topology of the power supply well, because it can be unmodifiable in the expected range, e.g. max 16 V as previously written.


    Incidentally, "tweaking" the voltage in overclocker environments is called "volt mods" so I just add for some working terminology. :)
  • #30
    electro
    Level 18  
    prosiak_wej wrote:
    It would be good to make a list of server power supplies in terms of the possibility of modification, for example changing the output voltage


    I do not want to kill the topic, but such a list is on the aforementioned rcgroups.com website, but you could make our "electrodes":
    Link

    From my analyzes it appears that while voltage regulation in a limited range is not a problem (built-in potentiometers), voltage control systems are a much bigger problem, which generally do not allow the voltage to be raised above 13V by turning off the power supply.