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LCR-T4 electronics components tester ATMega328 - Test and Review

TechEkspert 103587 593
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  • kkknc
    Level 43  
    It should be OK. Check how much the tester downloads.
  • gumisie
    Level 42  
    Why check?

    TechEkspert wrote:
    during measurement consumes 12-15mA current, while in sleep mode according to 20nA description (but in practice the current value should be lower,
  • DiZMar
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:

    ... 150 mA will this be the right amount?

    Enough.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    One more question, is it not too high intensity, and therefore, will any of the tester components not heat up ???
    Maybe try to lower them somehow? Can it leave it as it is?
  • Rezystor240
    Level 40  
    WS38 wrote:
    therefore, will any of the tester components get hot ???


    Nothing will heat up, this is a stabilized power supply, so as much as it has the original power from a 9V battery. Connect without worries. Just watch out for polarities.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:
    One more question, is it not too high intensity,
    Hands fall down ;)
    Once again the question appears in the forum such as "whether the 12V 6W bulb (or 0.5A) will not burn when connected to a 12V7Ah battery"
    If the 9V supply voltage is correct, the tester will not consume more current than it needs.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Not everyone is Einstein of electronics. But take it easy, I'm just starting out and I'm not offended when someone wants to demonstrate their superiority.
    What for? Still, thank you all for your help and clarifications.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:
    Not everyone is Einstein of electronics.
    And it doesn't have to be, but if you get the possession of the tester, the basics should be mastered. I do not demonstrate my superiority, but probably for the third time this month I read a similar question ...
    OKAY. There are no stupid questions, there are stupid answers and the first part of mine was not clever.
  • gumisie
    Level 42  
    vodiczka wrote:
    There are no stupid questions
    And these:
    WS38 wrote:
    One more question, is it not too high intensity, and therefore, will any of the tester components not heat up ???
    Maybe try to lower them somehow?
    :cry:
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Quote:
    if you own the tester, the basics should be mastered.


    I'm working on it.
    But for greater pleasure, I want to combine theory with practical exercises. And for this you need components checked in the tester.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    I have read the calibration procedure:
    - jumper test pins 1,2,3,
    - then a 100uF capacitor. I need to buy a test capacitor with a tolerance of +/- 0.5%.

    I am puzzled, however, by the fact that one person calibrated with a larger capacitor and claims that this is the correct method.
    I have too little knowledge to judge, but it seems to me at least strange, since there is a clear 100uF recommendation.

    I admit that I have already tested some elements to check if the tester works and there are no irregularities.
  • gumisie
    Level 42  
    WS38 wrote:
    I have too little knowledge to judge, but it seems to me at least strange, since there is a clear 100uF recommendation.
    I confirm, you really have: "little knowledge" .

    Capacitor capacity is: 100nF not 100uF.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Thanks to this element tester, I was able to repair the power supply, which will eventually become the power supply for the tester.
    Short:
    The faulty historic power supply Unitra Zatra ZS 0.15 / 9/3 (board from December 1982) was dismantled and each part carefully checked. I did not have a schematic, so I intuitively replaced a few elements with other ones obtained from the electric scrap. Ceramic capacitors marked 22 nF (in fact, their capacities were different) I replaced 25 nF ceramic capacitors. The ELWA 470 uF 16 V and 330 uF 10 V electrolytic capacitors were replaced with the NICHICON 1000 uF 10 V and ELITE 470 uF 25 V electrolytic capacitors, respectively. which seems a plus with a small, tight housing. I just wonder if this NICHICON should have more V. (if you need a tip). The rest of the elements have remained unchanged and are original. After the repair, the power supply works, but its parameters have changed - from those given on the housing 9 V and 150 mA, after measurements with a multimeter I get 9.55 V and 283 mA. This last measurement may be inaccurate, because I used only a small light bulb for 6V and 0.5 A (only I found it).
    All in all, it's fun and gaining experience, because considering the amount of time spent, buying a new power supply is more economical. Especially that on this plate there were no copper paths printed, only made of tin, which in several places peeled off or cracked, it can even be seen that already in the factory they were reinforced with wire inserts.
    Thanks for all the tips and patience.
  • Janusz_kk
    Level 29  
    WS38 wrote:
    All in all, it's fun and gaining experience, because considering the amount of time spent, buying a new power supply is more economical.

    It is not, you worked in your free time, if you did nothing t this time you would lose forever, and so you have a power supply, i.e. you earned :)

    WS38 wrote:
    Especially that on this plate there were no copper paths printed, only made of tin, which in several places peeled off or cracked, it can even be seen that already in the factory they were reinforced with wire inserts.

    You can't make tin paths :) there they are copper only additionally tinned, and that then the paper laminates were exceptionally
    of poor quality, and these paths detached themselves from just looking :) not to mention the soldering iron.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Janusz_kk wrote:
    You can't make tin paths :) there they are copper only additionally tinned


    In fact, there is something that looks like a thin silver foil then thickly tinned, but in a few places there was no trace of it, although there were etches or ironing marks, so I was making connections again. It seems that the factory has not everywhere ironed and adhered, because in a few places there are very shallow marks, but there is no film.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:
    After the repair, the power supply works, but its parameters have changed - from those given on the housing 9 V and 150 mA, after measurements with a multimeter I get 9.55 V and 283 mA. This last measurement may be inaccurate, because I only used it as a load small bulb for 6V and 0.5 A (only that I could find).
    Dude, Ohm's law bows. ;)
    If the bulb at 6V draws approx. 0.5A (500mA) then when powered from 9V it should draw approx. 750mA.
    Since it only consumes 283mA it means that you overloaded the power supply and the voltage on his output settled after loading the light bulb.
    Measure what voltage you have with the bulb connected because these 9.55V is no-load voltage.
    After loading 150mA, the voltage should be around 9V.
  • Janusz_kk
    Level 29  
    vodiczka wrote:
    Since it only consumes 283mA it means

    It just means that it measured the current with a light bulb and a SERIAL ammeter which added its resistance here.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    Janusz_kk wrote:
    It just means that it measured the current with a light bulb and a SERIAL ammeter which added its resistance here.
    You must be kidding, voltage drop on ammeter above 3V with current below 300mA :?: :D
    This would mean an ammeter resistance greater than 10?.
  • stasiek70
    Level 12  
    And the bulb is not a linear element. So the current does not increase proportionally to the voltage.
  • Janusz_kk
    Level 29  
    vodiczka wrote:
    You must be kidding, voltage drop on ammeter above 3V with current below 300mA
    This would mean an ammeter resistance greater than 10?.

    Not necessarily, the bulb is non-linear and as for the meter
    Read the thread about fuse, e.g. this post:
    https://www.elektroda.pl/rtvforum/viewtopic.php?p=18351285#18351285
    see for yourself, and we don't know what the author measured and to what extent.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    stasiek70 wrote:
    And the bulb is not a linear element. So the current does not increase proportionally to the voltage.
    What's one got to do with another? I wrote that the current should be "about 750mA" and not exactly that. The difference in resistance between cold fiber and filament at nominal voltage is much greater than when the supply voltage differs by +/- 50% from the nominal.
    In addition, it is not possible for a bulb with a voltage higher than the nominal voltage to flow at a lower current than the nominal voltage. Ohm's law also applies to light bulbs ;)
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Let me explain:
    I measured the voltage with a multimeter directly at the ends of the cables coming out of the power supply (without a light bulb attached).
    Then I connected the bulb exactly 6V 0.3 A and multimeter measured the intensity. Initially, I gave a 0.5 A light bulb because I could not read its markings and I had two almost identical bulbs with this marking, but under the influence of the discussion I grabbed the magnifying glass and read 0.3 A with difficulty. I apologize for the mistake. Once again I have seen how important accuracy and precision are in electronics.

    I'm only worried about this Nichicon electrolytic capacitor for 10 V. Should I not replace it with at least 16 V for example ???
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:
    Sorry for the mistake. Once again I have seen how important accuracy and precision are in electronics.
    OKAY. Half of the riddle is cleared.
    WS38 wrote:
    I measured the voltage with a multimeter directly at the ends of the cables coming out of the power supply ( without a light bulb attached ).
    Measure the voltage with the bulb attached, give the result and we will solve the puzzle to the end.

    Also write what ammeter you measured this 283 mA, if the multimeter is what current range was it set to?

    Added after 8 [minutes]:

    Janusz_kk wrote:
    see for yourself, and we don't know what the author measured and to what extent.
    We will write this, we will find out, but the range must have been greater than 200mA since he measured 283mA, so guessing about the high resistance of the fuse in the meter ;)
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Measurement:
    The bulb is this time a new KRYPTON 4.8 V 0.5 A. Measurements made with the light bulb on:
    360 mA stable current. (The first measurements - described earlier for safety I made with a multimeter probe connected to the socket 10A max. Now I changed to mA and uA socket). Measuring range set to mA (Auto Range).
    Voltage dropping with continuous measurement from 2.6 V - to 2 V. At 2 V, the measurement was interrupted.

    Multimeter with which I took measurements: VOLTCRAFT VC175

    Power transformer very warm.
  • vodiczka
    Level 43  
    WS38 wrote:
    Voltage drop with continuous measurement from 2.6 V to 2 V.
    WS38 wrote:
    Power transformer very warm.
    Mystery solved :|
    Both the voltage value and the heating transformer indicate a strong overload of the power supply.
    Connect both bulbs in series (those with 0.5A power consumption) and you should get a load close to the nominal. If it is still significantly above 150mA then connect both 6V (0.5A and 0.3A) in series

    WS38 wrote:
    I'm only worried about this Nichicon electrolytic capacitor for 10 V. Should I not replace it with at least 16 V for example ???
    Each capacitor should withstand a higher voltage than its nominal, at least 20% higher. Since you have 9.55V DC without load, that's OK. Old (Elwa) was also on 10V.
  • Janusz_kk
    Level 29  
    vodiczka wrote:
    In addition, it is not possible for a bulb with a voltage higher than the nominal voltage to flow at a lower current than the nominal voltage.

    You forget about the ammeter.
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    Continued measurements:
    Because I did not find a light bulb for about 9 V. (one turned out to be burned out), I connected the old PiKO battery drill with 12 V DC found in the box.
    When the drill was working, the measurements were as follows:
    Direct voltage also 9 V.
    Leakage current from 96 mA to 101 mA. It rose and fell - so all the time.

    Can anyone now tell me responsibly whether this power supply will be suitable for this T4 electronic component tester?
    Because the further into the forest the more trees and I see how much more I have to learn.
  • gumisie
    Level 42  
    WS38 wrote:
    Can anyone now tell me responsibly whether this power supply will be suitable for this T4 electronic component tester?
    Once again: YES.
    Do not mix with these bulbs, because in a moment you will damage it and it will be "sneezing".
  • WS38
    Level 13  
    I'm not combining anymore. Thanks a lot!
    Can anyone explain to me in a nutshell what this leaping intensity is all about? What is this phenomenon? I read the rest myself, because I was curious.